Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains

Govinda Sharma, Anni Huo, Taeko Kimura, Seiji Shiozawa, Reona Kobayashi, Naruhiko Sahara, Minaka Ishibashi, Shinsuke Ishigaki, Taro Saito, Kanae Ando, Shigeo Murayama, Masato Hasegawa, Gen Sobue, Hideyuki Okano, Shin ichi Hisanaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tau is a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neuronal axons. Hyperphosphorylated tau is a major component of neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates are also found in many neurodegenerative diseases, collectively referred to as “tauopathies,” and tau mutations are associated with familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Previous studies have generated transgenic mice with mutant tau as tauopathy models, but nonhuman primates, which are more similar to humans, may be a better model to study tauopathies. For example, the common marmoset is poised as a nonhuman primate model for investigating the etiology of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, no biochemical studies of tau have been conducted in marmoset brains. Here, we investigated several important aspects of tau, including expression of different tau isoforms and its phosphorylation status, in the marmoset brain. We found that marmoset tau does not possess the “primate-unique motif” in its N-terminal domain. We also discovered that the tau isoform expression pattern in marmosets is more similar to that of mice than that of humans, with adult marmoset brains expressing only four-repeat tau isoforms as in adult mice but unlike in adult human brains. Of note, tau in brains of marmoset newborns was phosphorylated at several sites associated with AD pathology. However, in adult marmoset brains, much of this phosphorylation was lost, except for Ser-202 and Ser-404 phosphorylation. These results reveal key features of tau expression and phosphorylation in the marmoset brain, a potentially useful nonhuman primate model of neurodegenerative diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11433-11444
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume294
Issue number30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Callithrix
Phosphorylation
Brain
Protein Isoforms
Neurodegenerative diseases
Tauopathies
Primates
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Alzheimer Disease
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration
Pathology
Neurofibrillary Tangles
Transgenic Mice
Axons
Newborn Infant
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Sharma, G., Huo, A., Kimura, T., Shiozawa, S., Kobayashi, R., Sahara, N., ... Hisanaga, S. I. (2019). Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 294(30), 11433-11444. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA119.008415

Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains. / Sharma, Govinda; Huo, Anni; Kimura, Taeko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kobayashi, Reona; Sahara, Naruhiko; Ishibashi, Minaka; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Saito, Taro; Ando, Kanae; Murayama, Shigeo; Hasegawa, Masato; Sobue, Gen; Okano, Hideyuki; Hisanaga, Shin ichi.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 294, No. 30, 01.01.2019, p. 11433-11444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, G, Huo, A, Kimura, T, Shiozawa, S, Kobayashi, R, Sahara, N, Ishibashi, M, Ishigaki, S, Saito, T, Ando, K, Murayama, S, Hasegawa, M, Sobue, G, Okano, H & Hisanaga, SI 2019, 'Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 294, no. 30, pp. 11433-11444. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA119.008415
Sharma G, Huo A, Kimura T, Shiozawa S, Kobayashi R, Sahara N et al. Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2019 Jan 1;294(30):11433-11444. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.RA119.008415
Sharma, Govinda ; Huo, Anni ; Kimura, Taeko ; Shiozawa, Seiji ; Kobayashi, Reona ; Sahara, Naruhiko ; Ishibashi, Minaka ; Ishigaki, Shinsuke ; Saito, Taro ; Ando, Kanae ; Murayama, Shigeo ; Hasegawa, Masato ; Sobue, Gen ; Okano, Hideyuki ; Hisanaga, Shin ichi. / Tau isoform expression and phosphorylation in marmoset brains. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2019 ; Vol. 294, No. 30. pp. 11433-11444.
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