Tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the cervical spine: a case report

Ryogo Furuhata, Akio Iwanami, Osahiko Tsuji, Narihito Nagoshi, Satoshi Suzuki, Eijiro Okada, Nobuyuki Fujita, Mitsuru Yagi, Morio Matsumoto, Masaya Nakamura, Kota Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TSGCTs) generally occur in the limb joints, and only rarely in the spine. This case report describes a patient with TSGCT of the spine at C1–C2, which was treated surgically and diagnosed as TSGCT. Case presentation: A 32-year-old woman with a 4-month history of neck pain and numbness in both upper extremities was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a neoplastic lesion extending from the left epidural space to the erector spinae muscles at the C1–C2 vertebral level, which was isointense on T1-weighted images, heterogeneously hypointense on T2-weighted images, and showed heterogeneous enhancement on gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced T1-weighted images. Computed tomography showed no findings suggestive of bone destruction of the vertebral body. Because the neurological symptoms were progressive, total macroscopic resection of the tumor was performed via a posterior approach. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed the diagnosis of TSGCT. Improvement of the both the neck pain and upper-extremity numbness was noted postoperatively. An MRI obtained 6 months after the surgery revealed no evidence of tumor recurrence and the postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion: TSGCT of the upper cervical spine (C1–C2) is rare, and this is the tenth reported case. If a tumor is heterogeneously hypointense on T2-weighted MRI, which reflects hemosiderosis, the possibility of this tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number23
JournalSpinal Cord Series and Cases
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Dec 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

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