The association between midlife living arrangement and psychiatrist-diagnosed depression in later life: who among your family members reduces the risk of depression?

For the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates the longitudinal association between living arrangements and psychiatrists’ diagnosis of depression in the general population. In 1990, 1254 Japanese men and women aged 40–59 years were enroled and completed questionnaires on the living arrangement in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (JPHC Study) and participated in a mental health screening (2014–2015). The study diagnosed a major depressive disorder (MDD) assessed by well-trained certified psychiatrists through medical examinations. During the follow-up, a total of 105 participants (36 men and 69 women) aged 64–84 years were diagnosed with MDD by psychiatrists. Living with a child (ren) was associated with a reduced risk of MDD for men but not for women; the respective multivariable ORs (95% CIs) were 0.42 (0.19–0.96) and 0.59 (0.32–1.09). These associations remained unchanged after adjusting for living with spouse and parent(s). In conclusion, living with a child (ren) was associated with a reduced risk of MDD in men, suggesting the role of a child (ren) in the prevention of MDD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number156
JournalTranslational psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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