The changes in spinal reciprocal inhibition during motor imagery in lower extremity

Hideto Nakayama, Michiyuki Kawakami, Yoko Takahashi, Kunitsugu Kondo, Eiji Shimizu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Motor imagery (MI) is known to improve motor function through enhancement of motor cortex activity. Spinal reciprocal inhibition (RI) is modulated by motor cortex activity, and, therefore, MI may change RI. The aim of this study was to examine the changes in RI during MI involving the lower extremity. Spinal RI was measured from the tibialis anterior (TA) to the soleus (SOL). Eleven healthy adults participated in experiment 1. All participants performed the following three conditions, and RI was assessed during each condition: (1) resting condition; (2) MI of ankle dorsiflexion condition (MI-DF); and (3) MI of ankle plantarflexion condition (MI-PF). Twelve healthy adults participated in experiment 2. All participants performed the following two conditions, and RI was assessed before and after MI practice for 10 min: (1) resting condition and (2) MI-DF. The interval between the conditioning and test stimulus (inter-stimulus interval; ISI) was set at 0, 1, 2, or 3 ms and 20 ms. In experiment 1, RI during MI-PF was significantly decreased compared with that during resting with both stimulus intervals. RI during MI-DF showed no significant change compared with that during resting with both ISIs. In experiment 2, the difference between the rest condition and the MI-DF condition after the MI task with ISI of 20 ms was significantly higher than before the MI task. Our findings suggest that real-time changes in RI during MI involving the lower extremity may vary depending on the direction of motion and MI practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurological Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Ankle dorsiflexion
  • Motor imagery
  • Real-time changes
  • Spinal reciprocal inhibition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The changes in spinal reciprocal inhibition during motor imagery in lower extremity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this