The effect of relational context on personal influence

Hikaru Yamamoto, Naohiro Mat Umura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Previous research on personal influence has focused on the sender, such as influencers or opinion leaders. This paper focuses on the context of personal influence i.e., social relationship between senders and receivers, and attempts to identify the optimal relational context for information cascade. The results of empirical analysis using both offline survey data and online blogosphere data provide evidence of optimal heterophily between the two; i.e., the receiver wants to receive information from someone slightly more knowledgeable, not from a distant expert. The context of personal influence is also examined in terms of the stage of hierarchical consumer behavior and sentiment. Finally, the patterns of influence are presented to depict the diffusion process. This analysis of relational context and the patterns of influence suggest that many grassroots influentials, rather than a few super influentials, play a central role in information cascade.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011
Pages1480-1485
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 2011 Oct 92011 Oct 11

Other

Other2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period11/10/911/10/11

Fingerprint

Consumer behavior

Keywords

  • Behavioral change
  • Influentials
  • Social influence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Yamamoto, H., & Umura, N. M. (2011). The effect of relational context on personal influence. In Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011 (pp. 1480-1485). [6113329] https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.66

The effect of relational context on personal influence. / Yamamoto, Hikaru; Umura, Naohiro Mat.

Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. p. 1480-1485 6113329.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yamamoto, H & Umura, NM 2011, The effect of relational context on personal influence. in Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011., 6113329, pp. 1480-1485, 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust, PASSAT 2011 and 2011 IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, SocialCom 2011, Boston, MA, United States, 11/10/9. https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.66
Yamamoto H, Umura NM. The effect of relational context on personal influence. In Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. p. 1480-1485. 6113329 https://doi.org/10.1109/PASSAT/SocialCom.2011.66
Yamamoto, Hikaru ; Umura, Naohiro Mat. / The effect of relational context on personal influence. Proceedings - 2011 IEEE International Conference on Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust and IEEE International Conference on Social Computing, PASSAT/SocialCom 2011. 2011. pp. 1480-1485
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