The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review

Fernando Caravaggio, Shinichiro Nakajima, Eric Plitman, Philip Gerretsen, Jun Ku Chung, Yusuke Iwata, Ariel Graff-Guerrero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for 1H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-53
Number of pages5
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 4
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Corpus Striatum
Glutamic Acid
Dopamine
Basal Ganglia
Neuroimaging
Neurotransmitter Agents
Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate : A mini-review. / Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel.

In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 65, 04.02.2016, p. 49-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caravaggio, Fernando ; Nakajima, Shinichiro ; Plitman, Eric ; Gerretsen, Philip ; Chung, Jun Ku ; Iwata, Yusuke ; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel. / The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate : A mini-review. In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 65. pp. 49-53.
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