The effect of the feeling of resolution and recognition performance on the revelation effect

Hiroshi Miura, Yuji Itoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The fact that engaging in a cognitive task before a recognition task increases the probability of “old” responses is known as the revelation effect. We used several cognitive tasks to examine whether the feeling of resolution, a key construct of the occurrence mechanism of the revelation effect, is related to the occurrence of the revelation effect. The results show that the revelation effect was not caused by a visual search task, which elicited the feeling of resolution, but caused by an unsolvable anagram task and an articulatory suppression task, which did not elicit the feeling of resolution. These results suggest that the revelation effect is not related to the feeling of resolution. Moreover, the revelation effect was likely to occur in participants who performed poorly on the recognition task. The result suggests that the revelation effect is inclined to occur when people depend more on familiarity than on recollection process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-108
Number of pages9
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume45
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1

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Emotions
Recognition (Psychology)
Revelation

Keywords

  • Cognitive process
  • Criterion shift
  • Familiarity
  • Memory
  • Recognition judgment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The effect of the feeling of resolution and recognition performance on the revelation effect. / Miura, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yuji.

In: Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 45, 01.10.2016, p. 100-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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