The evaluation of materials to provide health-related information as a population strategy in the worksite: The High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) study

Katsushi Yoshita, Taichiro Tanaka, Yuriko Kikuchi, Toru Takebayashi, Nagako Chiba, Junko Tamaki, Katsuyuki Miura, Takashi Kadowaki, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of newly developed materials for providing health-related information to the worksite population, we compared the amount of attention that employees paid to the materials. Methods: Study subjects were 2,361 employees in six companies partcipating in an intervention program between 2002 and 2003. Three kinds of media were used as tools for providing health information: [1] Point Of Purchase advertising menus (POP menus) were placed on all tables in company restaurants, [2] posters were put on walls and [3] leaflets were distributed at health-related events. One year or more after the introduction of these media, we compared the amount of attention paid to each type of medium. Results: Amongst the three types of media, the POP menu drew the most attention, although results were not consistent in all gender and company groups. Every piece of information provided by the POP menus was "always" or "almost always " read by 41% of the men and 51% of the women surveyed. The corresponding rate for posters was 30% in men and 32% in women. For leaflets, only 16% of men and 22% of women read almost all of the leaflets. More attention was paid to the POP menu when the sample was women, older, and ate at the company restaurant at least three times a week. Conclusion: The POP menu may provide health-related information to a broader range of people than posters and leaflets, therefore, it is an effective material for population strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-151
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Health and Preventive Medicine
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jul

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Occupational Health
Health Promotion
Workplace
Marketing
Posters
Health
Restaurants
Population
Industry
Personnel

Keywords

  • Attention paid to the medium
  • Characteristics of the medium
  • Health and nutrition education
  • Materials for health and nutrition education
  • Worksite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution

Cite this

The evaluation of materials to provide health-related information as a population strategy in the worksite : The High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) study. / Yoshita, Katsushi; Tanaka, Taichiro; Kikuchi, Yuriko; Takebayashi, Toru; Chiba, Nagako; Tamaki, Junko; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kadowaki, Takashi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu.

In: Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 4, 07.2004, p. 144-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshita, Katsushi ; Tanaka, Taichiro ; Kikuchi, Yuriko ; Takebayashi, Toru ; Chiba, Nagako ; Tamaki, Junko ; Miura, Katsuyuki ; Kadowaki, Takashi ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu. / The evaluation of materials to provide health-related information as a population strategy in the worksite : The High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) study. In: Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 144-151.
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