The facilitating effect of verbalization on the recognition memory of incidentally learned faces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that requiring people to verbally describe a target face from memory facilitates their subsequent recognition when their memory for the target is poor and interferes with recognition when such memory is strong. In Experiment 1, a target face was presented to participants for 30 s or 100 s under a nominal task instruction, and they incidentally familiarized themselves with it. Verbalization increased the rate of correct recognition only when the target was presented for 30 s and the performance of control participants was poor. In Experiment 2, participants observed a target without instruction for intentional learning or other nominal instruction, in a more ecologically valid context. Recognition performance was poor for control participants and verbalization increased the rate of correct recognition. These results appear to support the hypothesis. The implications for the identification of persons by eyewitnesses are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-433
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 May

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Recognition Memory
Verbalization
Recognition (Psychology)
Learning
Experiment
Ecologically Valid
Person
Eyewitness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

The facilitating effect of verbalization on the recognition memory of incidentally learned faces. / Itoh, Yuji.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 05.2005, p. 421-433.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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