The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic

Kenjiro Cho, Kensuke Fukuda, Hiroshi Esaki, Akira Kato

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been reported worldwide that peer-to-peer traffic is taking up a significant portion of backbone networks. In particular, it is prominent in Japan because of the high penetration rate of fiber-based broadband access. In this paper, we first report aggregated traffic measurements collected over 21 months from seven ISPs covering 42% of the Japanese backbone traffic. The backbone is dominated by symmetric residential traffic which increased 37% in 2005. We further investigate residential per-customer traffic in one of the ISPs by comparing DSL and fiber users, heavy-hitters and normal users, and geographic traffic matrices. The results reveal that a small segment of users dictate the overall behavior; 4% of heavy-hitters account for 75% of the inbound volume, and the fiber users account for 86% of the inbound volume. About 63% of the total residential volume is user-to-user traffic. The dominant applications exhibit poor locality and communicate with a wide range and number of peers. The distribution of heavy-hitters is heavy-tailed without a clear boundary between heavy-hitters and normal users, which suggests that users start playing with peer-to-peer applications, become heavy-hitters, and eventually shift from DSL to fiber. We provide conclusive empirical evidence from a large and diverse set of commercial backbone data that the emergence of new attractive applications has drastically affected traffic usage and capacity engineering requirements.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputer Communication Review
Pages207-218
Number of pages12
Volume36
Edition4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Oct
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

DSL
Fibers
Requirements engineering

Keywords

  • ISP backbone traffic
  • Residential broadband
  • Traffic growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems

Cite this

Cho, K., Fukuda, K., Esaki, H., & Kato, A. (2006). The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic. In Computer Communication Review (4 ed., Vol. 36, pp. 207-218) https://doi.org/10.1145/1151659.1159938

The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic. / Cho, Kenjiro; Fukuda, Kensuke; Esaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Akira.

Computer Communication Review. Vol. 36 4. ed. 2006. p. 207-218.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cho, K, Fukuda, K, Esaki, H & Kato, A 2006, The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic. in Computer Communication Review. 4 edn, vol. 36, pp. 207-218. https://doi.org/10.1145/1151659.1159938
Cho K, Fukuda K, Esaki H, Kato A. The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic. In Computer Communication Review. 4 ed. Vol. 36. 2006. p. 207-218 https://doi.org/10.1145/1151659.1159938
Cho, Kenjiro ; Fukuda, Kensuke ; Esaki, Hiroshi ; Kato, Akira. / The impact and implications of the growth in residential user-to-user traffic. Computer Communication Review. Vol. 36 4. ed. 2006. pp. 207-218
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