The Influence of Drinking Based on Data from Health Check-up

Seiichiro Kojima, Hiroyuki Ito, Shinji Takashimizu, Hajime Mizukami, Junko Nagata, Hitoshi Ichikawa, Takayuki Shirai, Koichi Shiraishi, Tetsuya Mine, Makoto Shiina, Norihito Watanabe

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Abstract

A survey of 21,493 patients who visited our Health Check-up Center during the 6-year period from 2005 to 2010 was conducted for the endpoints of drinking situation and various lifestyle-related diseases. Males accounted for 57.2% (mean age: 53.2 ± 11.4) and females accounted for 42.8% (mean age: 52.5 ± 11.4) of patients surveyed. Patients with no drinking habit accounted for 24.8% and 62.9% of males and females, respectively, and a large gender difference was seen in drinking frequency. When examined by age group, drinking frequency was found to increase with age in males, but gradually decreased with age in females. An examination of alcohol consumption in males revealed that 23.5% had an ethanol conversion rate of 10 g/day, 19.1% had a rate of < 20 g/day, and 18.2% had a rate of < 40 g/day. Meanwhile, in females, 22.7% had a rate of ≤ 10 g/day, 7.6% had a rate of ≤ 20 g/day and 4.6% had a rate of ≤ 40 g/day. The association between lifestyle-related disease endpoints and alcohol consumption was next examined by multivariate logistic analysis. The association between drinking and body mass index (BMI) revealed an odds ratio of around 0.8 in patients who consumed ≤ 40 g/day and a significantly reduced frequency of obesity. The odds ratio of hypertension increased in a dose-dependent manner from 1.3 to 1.6 in patients who consumed ≥ 40 g/day. The frequency of high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was reduced in light drinkers and the odds ratio decreased from 0.77 to about 0.6 as alcohol consumption increased: The frequency of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was similarly reduced in light drinkers, and the odds ratio decreased remarkably in a dose-dependent manner from 0.73 to 0.22 as alcohol consumption increased. The risk of triglycerides was reduced in light drinkers and was conversely significantly enhanced in heavy drinkers. In patients who consumed ≥ 20 g/day, the risk of impaired glucose tolerance increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased risk of hyperuricemia was seen even in light drinkers. and the odds ratio increased from 1.2 to 1.8 as alcohol consumption increased. The results of this cross-sectional study suggested that light drinking has a positive effect on BMI, LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides. On the other hand, heavy drinking was found to have a positive effect on LDL-C and HDL-C, but a negative effect on systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, fasting blood glucose and uric acid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-157
Number of pages14
JournalNihon Arukōru Yakubutsu Igakkai zasshi = Japanese journal of alcohol studies & drug dependence
Volume50
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Kojima, S., Ito, H., Takashimizu, S., Mizukami, H., Nagata, J., Ichikawa, H., Shirai, T., Shiraishi, K., Mine, T., Shiina, M., & Watanabe, N. (2015). The Influence of Drinking Based on Data from Health Check-up. Nihon Arukōru Yakubutsu Igakkai zasshi = Japanese journal of alcohol studies & drug dependence, 50(3), 144-157.