The inverse relationship between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in a 9.6-year follow-up study in the Japanese general population

Tomonori Okamura, Takehito Hayakawa, Takashi Kadowaki, Yoshikuni Kita, Akira Okayama, Hirotsugu Ueshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In populations with higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and lower coronary mortality than Western populations, such as in Japan, the beneficial effect of HDL-C on all-cause mortality may be different. Furthermore, prior studies have not focused on very high level of HDL-C. A total of 7175 community Japanese residents without a past history of cardiovascular disease in 300 randomly selected districts were followed for 9.6 years. During follow-up, there were 636 deaths. The multivariate adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of HDL-C for all-cause or cause-specific mortality was calculated using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors. The all-cause mortality suggested an inverse, graded relation with HDL-C categories; HR for the very high HDL-C category (≥1.82 mmol/L), compared with the reference group (1.04-1.55 mmol/L), was 0.73 (95% confidence interval, C.I., 0.50-1.06) for men, 0.63 (95% C.I., 0.41-0.94) for women and 0.70 (95% C.I., 0.53-0.93) when men and women were combined. Serum HDL-C as a continuous variable showed a significant inverse association with all-cause mortality. The cardiovascular mortality indicated a non-significant but inverse graded relation with HDL-C categories. As in the many Western populations, serum HDL-C levels were inversely associated with all-cause mortality in the Japanese general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-150
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume184
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jan
Externally publishedYes

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HDL Cholesterol
Mortality
Serum
Population
Proportional Hazards Models
Japan
Cardiovascular Diseases
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Mortality
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

The inverse relationship between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in a 9.6-year follow-up study in the Japanese general population. / Okamura, Tomonori; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kadowaki, Takashi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 184, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 143-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Okamura, Tomonori ; Hayakawa, Takehito ; Kadowaki, Takashi ; Kita, Yoshikuni ; Okayama, Akira ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu. / The inverse relationship between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in a 9.6-year follow-up study in the Japanese general population. In: Atherosclerosis. 2006 ; Vol. 184, No. 1. pp. 143-150.
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