The labour market incorporation of Brazilian immigrants in Japan: Institutional arrangements and their labour market outcomes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study argues that the way in which Brazilian immigrants are incorporated into the labour market is linked to the context of their reception in Japan. Although previous studies have documented this relationship in North America and Europe, little is known about the socioeconomic circumstances and the institutional settings in several Asian countries that currently accept a large number of immigrants. The results from this study indicate that the human and social capital of Brazilian immigrants has played only a minor role in improving their economic well-being. The more stringent regulations of the Japanese labour market have hindered the efforts of Brazilian immigrants to obtain access to 'good' jobs, regardless of the individual immigrant's degree of human and social capital. The most effective way for Brazilian immigrants to upgrade their earnings is to find a job with overtime work and long working hours. Social capital partly helps these immigrants find this type of job. The findings of this study also reflect a lack of public debate over and institutional support for the integration of immigrants into the larger Japanese society.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMigration
Subtitle of host publicationPractices, Challenges and Impact
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages154-178
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)9781622576456
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Takenoshita, H. (2013). The labour market incorporation of Brazilian immigrants in Japan: Institutional arrangements and their labour market outcomes. In Migration: Practices, Challenges and Impact (pp. 154-178). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..