The long-term outcome of hearing preservation following vestibular schwannoma surgery

Y. Inoue, J. Kanzaki, Kaoru Ogawa, N. Hoya, S. Takei, R. Shiobara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the long-term outcome of preserved hearing after vestibular schwannoma surgery.Methods: Subjects are 20 unilateral vestibular schwannoma patients whose class A hearing of the AAO-HNS classification was preserved successfully after tumor removal. Hearing preservation surgery was attempted via the middle cranial fossa (MCF) or the extended MCF approach. The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 16 years. The outcome measures included the pure tone average (PTA) and speech discrimination score (SDS).Results: PTA was maintained in less than 30 dB in 11 out of 20 patients within 2 years follow-up, six out of 13 patients within 4 years follow-up, and two out of five patients within 6 years follow-up, respectively. SDS was maintained in more than 70% in 17 out of 20 patients within 2 years follow-up, ten out of 13 patients within 4 years follow-up, and three out of five patients within 6 years follow-up, respectively.Conclusions: The preserved hearing maintained about more than 40% of the patients with the class A hearing in every 2 years follow-up. From this result, we can conclude that the hearing preservation surgery could be one of the best treatments for vestibular schwannoma patients with class A hearing. However, further study will be needed to clarify the mechanism of the deterioration in hearing after hearing preservation surgery. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalAuris Nasus Larynx
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Acoustic Neuroma
Hearing
Middle Cranial Fossa
Speech Perception
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Hearing level
  • Hearing preservation surgery
  • Speech discrimination score
  • Vestibular schwannoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

The long-term outcome of hearing preservation following vestibular schwannoma surgery. / Inoue, Y.; Kanzaki, J.; Ogawa, Kaoru; Hoya, N.; Takei, S.; Shiobara, R.

In: Auris Nasus Larynx, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2000, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inoue, Y. ; Kanzaki, J. ; Ogawa, Kaoru ; Hoya, N. ; Takei, S. ; Shiobara, R. / The long-term outcome of hearing preservation following vestibular schwannoma surgery. In: Auris Nasus Larynx. 2000 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 9-14.
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