The neural correlates of desire

Hideaki Kawabata, Semir Zeki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an event-related fMRI study, we scanned eighteen normal human subjects while they viewed three categories of pictures (events, objects and persons) which they classified according to desirability (desirable, indifferent or undesirable). Each category produced activity in a distinct part of the visual brain, thus reflecting its functional specialization. We used conjunction analysis to learn whether there is a brain area which is always active when a desirable picture is viewed, regardless of the category to which it belongs. The conjunction analysis of the contrast desirable > undesirable revealed activity in the superior orbito-frontal cortex. This activity bore a positive linear relationship to the declared level of desirability. The conjunction analysis of desirable > indifferent revealed activity in the mid-cingulate cortex and in the anterior cingulate cortex. In the former, activity was greater for desirable and undesirable stimuli than for stimuli classed as indifferent. Other conjunction analyses produced no significant effects. These results show that categorizing any stimulus according to its desirability activates three different brain areas: the superior orbito-frontal, the mid-cingulate, and the anterior cingulate cortices.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere3027
JournalPLoS One
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Aug 27
Externally publishedYes

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Gyrus Cinguli
Brain
cortex
brain
Frontal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The neural correlates of desire. / Kawabata, Hideaki; Zeki, Semir.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 3, No. 8, e3027, 27.08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawabata, Hideaki ; Zeki, Semir. / The neural correlates of desire. In: PLoS One. 2008 ; Vol. 3, No. 8.
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