The package redelivery problem, convenience store solution, and the delivery desert: Case study in Aoba Ward, Yokohama

Shun Nakayama, Wanglin Yan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The redelivery problem occurs when a delivery service cannot deliver an item to the recipient on the first attempt, requiring one or more additional attempts. There are impacts on profit, efficiency, convenience, traffic, and the environment. In recent years, the redelivery problem in Japan has been aggravated by the growth of e-commerce, which increases delivery volumes. As a solution, many convenience stores offer courier package pickup services, but the actual net benefits are uncertain. In this industry, store locations are chosen based on profitability and subject to laws and regulations. This study developed a model to assess the accessibility of convenience stores and their possible contribution to solve the redelivery problem. We defined a “delivery desert” as area where a resident cannot access the nearest convenience store package pickup service within walking distance, and developed a model that considers physical load relative to customer age and topographic slope. We then conducted a case study in a suburban neighborhood in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area and showed that (1) about 65% of residents in the study area live in a delivery desert, (2) regulations that restrict the location of convenience stores have a very small impact on our results, and (3) the percentage of people living in a delivery desert is low for the age groups targeted by convenience stores. These findings could serve as a reference in policy discussions for solving the redelivery problem.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Urban Management
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

desert
electronic commerce
resident
walking
regulation
profitability
accessibility
metropolitan area
electronic business
age group
agglomeration area
profit
customer
recipient
industry
Japan
traffic
efficiency
Law
services

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Convenience store
  • Delivery desert
  • GIS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urban Studies
  • Public Administration
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

@article{ce7627f6731a4e9a94d924205606474a,
title = "The package redelivery problem, convenience store solution, and the delivery desert: Case study in Aoba Ward, Yokohama",
abstract = "The redelivery problem occurs when a delivery service cannot deliver an item to the recipient on the first attempt, requiring one or more additional attempts. There are impacts on profit, efficiency, convenience, traffic, and the environment. In recent years, the redelivery problem in Japan has been aggravated by the growth of e-commerce, which increases delivery volumes. As a solution, many convenience stores offer courier package pickup services, but the actual net benefits are uncertain. In this industry, store locations are chosen based on profitability and subject to laws and regulations. This study developed a model to assess the accessibility of convenience stores and their possible contribution to solve the redelivery problem. We defined a “delivery desert” as area where a resident cannot access the nearest convenience store package pickup service within walking distance, and developed a model that considers physical load relative to customer age and topographic slope. We then conducted a case study in a suburban neighborhood in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area and showed that (1) about 65{\%} of residents in the study area live in a delivery desert, (2) regulations that restrict the location of convenience stores have a very small impact on our results, and (3) the percentage of people living in a delivery desert is low for the age groups targeted by convenience stores. These findings could serve as a reference in policy discussions for solving the redelivery problem.",
keywords = "Accessibility, Convenience store, Delivery desert, GIS",
author = "Shun Nakayama and Wanglin Yan",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jum.2019.08.001",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Urban Management",
issn = "2226-5856",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The package redelivery problem, convenience store solution, and the delivery desert

T2 - Case study in Aoba Ward, Yokohama

AU - Nakayama, Shun

AU - Yan, Wanglin

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The redelivery problem occurs when a delivery service cannot deliver an item to the recipient on the first attempt, requiring one or more additional attempts. There are impacts on profit, efficiency, convenience, traffic, and the environment. In recent years, the redelivery problem in Japan has been aggravated by the growth of e-commerce, which increases delivery volumes. As a solution, many convenience stores offer courier package pickup services, but the actual net benefits are uncertain. In this industry, store locations are chosen based on profitability and subject to laws and regulations. This study developed a model to assess the accessibility of convenience stores and their possible contribution to solve the redelivery problem. We defined a “delivery desert” as area where a resident cannot access the nearest convenience store package pickup service within walking distance, and developed a model that considers physical load relative to customer age and topographic slope. We then conducted a case study in a suburban neighborhood in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area and showed that (1) about 65% of residents in the study area live in a delivery desert, (2) regulations that restrict the location of convenience stores have a very small impact on our results, and (3) the percentage of people living in a delivery desert is low for the age groups targeted by convenience stores. These findings could serve as a reference in policy discussions for solving the redelivery problem.

AB - The redelivery problem occurs when a delivery service cannot deliver an item to the recipient on the first attempt, requiring one or more additional attempts. There are impacts on profit, efficiency, convenience, traffic, and the environment. In recent years, the redelivery problem in Japan has been aggravated by the growth of e-commerce, which increases delivery volumes. As a solution, many convenience stores offer courier package pickup services, but the actual net benefits are uncertain. In this industry, store locations are chosen based on profitability and subject to laws and regulations. This study developed a model to assess the accessibility of convenience stores and their possible contribution to solve the redelivery problem. We defined a “delivery desert” as area where a resident cannot access the nearest convenience store package pickup service within walking distance, and developed a model that considers physical load relative to customer age and topographic slope. We then conducted a case study in a suburban neighborhood in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area and showed that (1) about 65% of residents in the study area live in a delivery desert, (2) regulations that restrict the location of convenience stores have a very small impact on our results, and (3) the percentage of people living in a delivery desert is low for the age groups targeted by convenience stores. These findings could serve as a reference in policy discussions for solving the redelivery problem.

KW - Accessibility

KW - Convenience store

KW - Delivery desert

KW - GIS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070677941&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070677941&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jum.2019.08.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jum.2019.08.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85070677941

JO - Journal of Urban Management

JF - Journal of Urban Management

SN - 2226-5856

ER -