The place of government in transition: Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1176/7 Richard FitzNigel was asked to compose the Dialogue of the Exchequer while 'sitting by the window of a tower (specule) next to the river Thames’, probably in his house in Westminster.1 Important figures in royal government like Richard must have settled and spent much time in Westminster around this period, as governmental affairs came to be transacted more often in this place. By this time, Westminster was on the way to becoming the ‘royal capital’. Such development, however, was quite uncertain when William the Conqueror was crowned at Westminster several months after the battle of Hastings. London was then already the largest and most influential town in England, which needed to be subdued by William before his coronation, but Westminster was to develop as a relatively small but distinct urban community in the Middle Ages, and in 1066 it was rather a bleak damp area that stretched around the abbey rebuilt by Edward the Confessor, though there were around it some houses, which were set on fire during William's coronation.2 .

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King
PublisherAshgate Publishing Ltd
Pages62-75
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9781472413741, 9781472413734
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Winchester
Westminster
Government
12th Century
England
Medieval Period
Tower
Thames
Rivers
Exchequer
Abbeys
Confessors
Coronation
Royal Government

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Yoshitake, K. (2015). The place of government in transition: Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century. In Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King (pp. 62-75). Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

The place of government in transition : Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century. / Yoshitake, Kenji.

Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015. p. 62-75.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Yoshitake, K 2015, The place of government in transition: Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century. in Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, pp. 62-75.
Yoshitake K. The place of government in transition: Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century. In Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King. Ashgate Publishing Ltd. 2015. p. 62-75
Yoshitake, Kenji. / The place of government in transition : Winchester, westminster and london in the mid-twelfth century. Rulership and Rebellion in the Anglo-Norman World, C.1066-C.1216: Essays in Honour of Professor Edmund King. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015. pp. 62-75
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