The prognostic impact of cigarette smoking on patients with non-small cell lung cancer

Ryo Maeda, Junji Yoshida, Genichiro Ishii, Tomoyuki Hishida, Mitsuyo Nishimura, Kanji Nagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The purposes of this study are to investigate the association between cigarette smoking and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate its significance as a predictor of recurrence after resection. Methods: A total of 2295 consecutive patients with NSCLC underwent complete resection with systematic node dissection between August 1992 and December 2006 at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. Results: A statistically significant difference in the 5-year overall survival rate was observed between never and ever smokers in patients with stage I (92% and 76%, respectively, p < 0.001) NSCLC, whereas no difference was observed in stage II (57% and 52%, respectively, p = 0.739) and stage III (30% and 33%, respectively, p = 0.897). In patients with stage I NSCLC, 5-year recurrence-free proportions (RFPs) for never and ever smokers were 89% and 80%, respectively (p < 0.001). In contrast, the 5-year RFPs for never smokers were lower than those for ever smokers in stage II (44% and 60%, respectively, p = 0.049) and stage III (17% and 31%, respectively, p = 0.004). In stage I patients, significant difference in 5-year RFP was observed between never and ever smokers (89% and 83%, respectively) in patients with adenocarcinoma, but not in patients with nonadenocarcinoma (82% and 76%, respectively). Conclusions: Smoking history showed different impact on postoperative recurrence in patients with NSCLC between stage I and stages II and III, and depending on histology in stage I patients. Disease stages should be considered while evaluating smoking history as a predictor of recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-742
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Apr
Externally publishedYes

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Smoking
Recurrence
History
Cancer Care Facilities
Dissection
Histology
Adenocarcinoma
Survival Rate

Keywords

  • Adenocarcinoma
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Recurrence
  • Thoracic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

The prognostic impact of cigarette smoking on patients with non-small cell lung cancer. / Maeda, Ryo; Yoshida, Junji; Ishii, Genichiro; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Nagai, Kanji.

In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 735-742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maeda, Ryo ; Yoshida, Junji ; Ishii, Genichiro ; Hishida, Tomoyuki ; Nishimura, Mitsuyo ; Nagai, Kanji. / The prognostic impact of cigarette smoking on patients with non-small cell lung cancer. In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 735-742.
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