The relationships between feelings of satisfaction and burden with respect to activity and social support among health promotion volunteers in Japan

Hiroshi Murayama, Atsuko Taguchi, Sachiyo Murashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Health promotion volunteers (HPVs) working to promote community health in Japan feel both satisfaction and burden with their community engagement activities. This study examined the relationship between their satisfaction and burden toward their activities and social support. A mail-in self-check questionnaire survey was distributed to 604 HPVs in Japan in September 2005. Multiple regression analysis showed that high "activity attachment" was associated with more support from family, colleagues, and public health nurses; high "personal benefit" was associated with more support from colleagues and public health nurses. It was also found that low "burden on everyday life" was associated with more support from family and colleagues and that low "psychological burden" was associated with more support from colleagues and community members. It became clear that social support from various sources was positively related to HPVs' satisfaction and negatively related to HPVs' burden with their activities. To encourage HPV activities, it is important to consider what kinds of social support would be most useful to increase the satisfaction and reduce the burden felt by HPVs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-287
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Burden
  • Health promotion volunteer
  • Japan
  • Satisfaction
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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