The role of cytotoxic macrophages in non-obese diabetic mice: cytotoxicity against murine mastocytoma and beta-cell lines

A. Kasuga, T. Maruyama, I. Takei, A. Shimada, T. Kasatani, Kenji Watanabe, T. Saruta, T. Nakaki, S. Habu, J. Miyazaki

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Abstract

The cytotoxicity of macrophages from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice against murine mastocytoma (P-815), and murine beta-cell lines having the NOD gene background (MIN6N-9a), were examined. Peritoneal exudate cells from 20-week-old mice showed higher cytotoxicity, measured as inhibition of thymidine uptake into P-815, than those from 12-week-old mice (p <0.01). In cyclophosphamide-injected mice, cytotoxicity of peritoneal exudate cells had increased at 8 days post-injection, at which time the mice were not diabetic. To confirm macrophage cytotoxicity against pancreatic cells and examine its cytolytic mechanism, the cytotoxicity of peritoneal exudate cells from cyclophosphamide-injected NOD mice against MIN6N-9a cells was measured by the chromium release assay. These peritoneal exudate cells showed higher cytotoxicity as compared to those of saline-injected mice (p <0.001). Macrophages were demonstrated to be the major component of peritoneal exudate cells (50%) by flowcytometric analyses. Cytotoxicity increased with macrophage enrichment by adhesion (p <0.01). Furthermore, a macrophage toxin, silica, completely blocked the cytotoxicity (p <0.001). Cytokines (interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor) and a nitric-oxide-producing vasodilator, sodium nitroprusside, were cytotoxic to MIN6N-9a cells but only sodium nitroprusside showed cytotoxicity when incubated for the same period as peritoneal exudate cells. Thus, macrophages play an important role in beta-cell destruction and soluble factors other than cytokines (e.g. nitric oxide) may be mediators of this early cytolytic process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1252-1257
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetologia
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993 Dec

Fingerprint

Mastocytoma
Inbred NOD Mouse
Macrophages
Cell Line
Exudates and Transudates
Nitroprusside
Cyclophosphamide
Nitric Oxide
Cytokines
Chromium
Vasodilator Agents
Interleukin-1
Silicon Dioxide
Thymidine
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha

Keywords

  • cytokine
  • macrophage
  • nitric oxide
  • Non-obese diabetic mice
  • Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Kasuga, A., Maruyama, T., Takei, I., Shimada, A., Kasatani, T., Watanabe, K., ... Miyazaki, J. (1993). The role of cytotoxic macrophages in non-obese diabetic mice: cytotoxicity against murine mastocytoma and beta-cell lines. Diabetologia, 36(12), 1252-1257. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00400802

The role of cytotoxic macrophages in non-obese diabetic mice : cytotoxicity against murine mastocytoma and beta-cell lines. / Kasuga, A.; Maruyama, T.; Takei, I.; Shimada, A.; Kasatani, T.; Watanabe, Kenji; Saruta, T.; Nakaki, T.; Habu, S.; Miyazaki, J.

In: Diabetologia, Vol. 36, No. 12, 12.1993, p. 1252-1257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kasuga, A, Maruyama, T, Takei, I, Shimada, A, Kasatani, T, Watanabe, K, Saruta, T, Nakaki, T, Habu, S & Miyazaki, J 1993, 'The role of cytotoxic macrophages in non-obese diabetic mice: cytotoxicity against murine mastocytoma and beta-cell lines', Diabetologia, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 1252-1257. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00400802
Kasuga, A. ; Maruyama, T. ; Takei, I. ; Shimada, A. ; Kasatani, T. ; Watanabe, Kenji ; Saruta, T. ; Nakaki, T. ; Habu, S. ; Miyazaki, J. / The role of cytotoxic macrophages in non-obese diabetic mice : cytotoxicity against murine mastocytoma and beta-cell lines. In: Diabetologia. 1993 ; Vol. 36, No. 12. pp. 1252-1257.
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AU - Kasatani, T.

AU - Watanabe, Kenji

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AB - The cytotoxicity of macrophages from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice against murine mastocytoma (P-815), and murine beta-cell lines having the NOD gene background (MIN6N-9a), were examined. Peritoneal exudate cells from 20-week-old mice showed higher cytotoxicity, measured as inhibition of thymidine uptake into P-815, than those from 12-week-old mice (p <0.01). In cyclophosphamide-injected mice, cytotoxicity of peritoneal exudate cells had increased at 8 days post-injection, at which time the mice were not diabetic. To confirm macrophage cytotoxicity against pancreatic cells and examine its cytolytic mechanism, the cytotoxicity of peritoneal exudate cells from cyclophosphamide-injected NOD mice against MIN6N-9a cells was measured by the chromium release assay. These peritoneal exudate cells showed higher cytotoxicity as compared to those of saline-injected mice (p <0.001). Macrophages were demonstrated to be the major component of peritoneal exudate cells (50%) by flowcytometric analyses. Cytotoxicity increased with macrophage enrichment by adhesion (p <0.01). Furthermore, a macrophage toxin, silica, completely blocked the cytotoxicity (p <0.001). Cytokines (interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor) and a nitric-oxide-producing vasodilator, sodium nitroprusside, were cytotoxic to MIN6N-9a cells but only sodium nitroprusside showed cytotoxicity when incubated for the same period as peritoneal exudate cells. Thus, macrophages play an important role in beta-cell destruction and soluble factors other than cytokines (e.g. nitric oxide) may be mediators of this early cytolytic process.

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