Time trend in interest and satisfaction towards clinical training and academic activities among early-career cardiologists

The Japanese circulation society post-graduate training survey

Takashi Kohno, Shun Kosaka, Yasuyoshi Takei, Keiichi Fukuda, Yukio Ozaki, Akira Yamashina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Satisfaction among early-career cardiologists is a key performance metric for cardiovascular (CV) educational programs. To assess the time trend in the interest and activities of early-career cardiologists regarding their training, we conducted web-based surveys in 2011 and 2015. Methods and Results: Early-career cardiologists were defined as physicians who planned to attend Japanese Circulation Society (JCS) annual meetings within 10 years of graduation. A total of 272 and 177 participants completed the survey for the years 2011 and 2015, respectively. Survey questions were designed to obtain core insights into the workplace, research interests, and demographic profile of respondents. Main outcome measures were satisfaction levels with their training program. The overall satisfaction rate for training was lower in 2015 than 2011; this was largely affected by decreases in the rates of satisfaction for valvular heart disease, ischemic heart disease, advanced heart failure, and congenital heart disease. Moreover, satisfaction with CV training was associated with the volume of invasive procedures such as coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions in 2011 but not 2015. Conclusions: Early-career cardiologists’ satisfaction with their training decreased during the study period, especially in the field of evolving subspecialties (e.g., valvular heart disease or advanced heart failure), suggesting that prompt reevaluation of the current educational curriculum is needed to properly adapt to progress in cardiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-429
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Teaching
Heart Valve Diseases
Heart Failure
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Cardiology
Coronary Angiography
Workplace
Curriculum
Myocardial Ischemia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cardiologists
Heart Diseases
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians
Education
Research

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular medicine
  • Medical training
  • Postgraduate education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Time trend in interest and satisfaction towards clinical training and academic activities among early-career cardiologists : The Japanese circulation society post-graduate training survey. / Kohno, Takashi; Kosaka, Shun; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ozaki, Yukio; Yamashina, Akira.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 423-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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