Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design

Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation

Kosuke Ishii, Sun K. Kim, Whitfield Fowler, Takashi Maeno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas team project-based learning of engineering design has attracted wide acceptance, it is still rare to see a curriculum that addresses high level societal needs involving diverse students with a wide range of practical experience. Such a curriculum should develop a shared understanding of the use of scenarios for amorphous products and a process to objectively evaluate the project progress while the design concepts mature. This paper describes two key tools that respond to these challenges: 1) scenario prototyping and 2) cross-team project scorecarding. These tools evolved through a collaborative curriculum development of Keio University, MIT, and Stanford in the development of the Active Learning Project Sequence (ALPS), a capstone experience for Keio's new Graduate School of System Design and Management (SDM). ALPS selected a theme from the "Voice of Society," according to which the project teams generated solution scenarios, identified requirements, and described the proposed system using appropriate prototypes of not only hardware but other amorphous means as well. The twelve ALPS teams in 2008 addressed the theme "Enhancing the Lives of Seniors in Japan," which led to more specific scenarios. The paper gives an overview of the ALPS workshop sequence, and describes in detail two key learning modules that were essential in integrating the multi-disciplinary teams: a) scenario prototyping and b) cross-team project scorecarding. These methods are going through further trials in Stanford's own Design for Manufacturability curriculum involving 10 project teams in the US and Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Pages135-145
Number of pages11
Volume8
EditionPARTS A AND B
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 2009 Aug 302009 Sep 2

Other

OtherASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period09/8/3009/9/2

Fingerprint

Project-based Learning
Active Learning
Prototyping
Curricula
System Design
Systems analysis
Scenarios
Evaluation
Japan
Students
Hardware
Engineering Design
Problem-Based Learning
Prototype
Module
Curriculum
Evaluate
Requirements

Keywords

  • Amorphous systems system development active learning
  • Cross-team project evaluation
  • Design of manufacturability
  • Multi-disciplinary teams
  • Project scorecard
  • Scenario graph
  • Scenario prototyping
  • Team project-based learning
  • Voice of society

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Ishii, K., Kim, S. K., Fowler, W., & Maeno, T. (2009). Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design: Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference (PARTS A AND B ed., Vol. 8, pp. 135-145) https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-86492

Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design : Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation. / Ishii, Kosuke; Kim, Sun K.; Fowler, Whitfield; Maeno, Takashi.

Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 8 PARTS A AND B. ed. 2009. p. 135-145.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ishii, K, Kim, SK, Fowler, W & Maeno, T 2009, Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design: Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation. in Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. PARTS A AND B edn, vol. 8, pp. 135-145, ASME 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2009, San Diego, CA, United States, 09/8/30. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-86492
Ishii K, Kim SK, Fowler W, Maeno T. Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design: Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation. In Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. PARTS A AND B ed. Vol. 8. 2009. p. 135-145 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2009-86492
Ishii, Kosuke ; Kim, Sun K. ; Fowler, Whitfield ; Maeno, Takashi. / Tools for project-based Active Learning of amorphous systems design : Scenario prototyping and cross team peer evaluation. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference. Vol. 8 PARTS A AND B. ed. 2009. pp. 135-145
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