Tracking of BMI in Japanese children from 6 to 18 years of age: Reference values for annual BMI incremental change and proposal for size of increment indicative of risk for obesity

Mikako Inokuchi, Nobutake Matsuo, John I. Takayama, Tomonobu Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A large incremental increase in BMI indicates excess fat deposition in most children, but the reference values for identifying those at risk for developing obesity have not been defined.Aim: To determine the mean and SD of annual incremental change (ΔSDS) in BMI for Japanese school children. Subjects and methods: A cohort of 669 Japanese children in one private school in Tokyo in whom height and weight were measured annually between 6-17 years of age. Each child's BMI was converted to SDS as based on the 1978-1981 Japanese references for the 12 annual measurements to derive the correlation coefficient, r, between two successive measurements. Using the formula, SD of ΔSDS = √2(1-r), the mean and SD of ΔSDS were obtained. Results: Excess BMI gain was defined in terms of ΔSDS in Japanese children. Annual incremental increase greater than 2 SD of ΔSDS, equivalent to 1-2 BMI units/year for younger children and 2-3 BMI units/year for older children, respectively, indicates rapid increase in body fat in Japanese children. Conclusion: Based on analysis of incremental change in BMI in this cohort, a cut-off has been identified that can be used to identify children at risk for developing obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-149
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Human Biology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Mar 1

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Longitudinal study
  • Reference values
  • ΔSDS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Physiology
  • Ageing
  • Genetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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