Trained Eyes

Experience Promotes Adaptive Gaze Control in Dynamic and Uncertain Visual Environments

Shuichiro Taya, David Windridge, Magda Osman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current eye-tracking research suggests that our eyes make anticipatory movements to a location that is relevant for a forthcoming task. Moreover, there is evidence to suggest that with more practice anticipatory gaze control can improve. However, these findings are largely limited to situations where participants are actively engaged in a task. We ask: does experience modulate anticipative gaze control while passively observing a visual scene? To tackle this we tested people with varying degrees of experience of tennis, in order to uncover potential associations between experience and eye movement behaviour while they watched tennis videos. The number, size, and accuracy of saccades (rapid eye-movements) made around 'events,' which is critical for the scene context (i.e. hit and bounce) were analysed. Overall, we found that experience improved anticipatory eye-movements while watching tennis clips. In general, those with extensive experience showed greater accuracy of saccades to upcoming event locations; this was particularly prevalent for events in the scene that carried high uncertainty (i.e. ball bounces). The results indicate that, even when passively observing, our gaze control system utilizes prior relevant knowledge in order to anticipate upcoming uncertain event locations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere71371
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug 12
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tennis
Eye movements
Saccades
eyes
Eye Movements
REM Sleep
Surgical Instruments
Uncertainty
Research
uncertainty
Control systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Trained Eyes : Experience Promotes Adaptive Gaze Control in Dynamic and Uncertain Visual Environments. / Taya, Shuichiro; Windridge, David; Osman, Magda.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 8, e71371, 12.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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