Transgenic restoration of long-chain n-3 fatty acids in insulin target tissues improves resolution capacity and alleviates obesity-linked inflammation and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed mice

Phillip J. White, Makoto Arita, Ryo Taguchi, Jing X. Kang, André Marette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - The catabasis of inflammation is an active process directed by n-3 derived pro-resolving lipid mediators. We aimed to determine whether high-fat (HF) diet-induced n-3 deficiency compromises the resolution capacity of obese mice and thereby contributes to obesity-linked inflammation and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used transgenic expression of the fat-1 n-3 fatty acid desaturase from C. elegans to endogenously restore n-3 fatty acids in HF-fed mice. After 8 weeks on HF or chow diets, wild-type and fat-1 transgenic mice were subjected to insulin and glucose tolerance tests and a resolution assay was performed. Metabolic tissues were then harvested for biochemical analyses. RESULTS - We report that the n-3 docosanoid resolution mediator protectin D1 is lacking in muscle and adipose tissue of HF-fed wild-type mice. Accordingly, HF-fed wild-type mice have an impaired capacity to resolve an acute inflammatory response and display elevated adipose macrophage accrual and chemokine/cytokine expression. This is associated with insulin resistance and higher activation of iNOS and JNK in muscle and liver. These defects are reversed in HF-fed fat-1 mice, in which the biosynthesis of this important n-3 docosanoid resolution mediator is improved. Importantly, transgenic restoration of n-3 fatty acids prevented obesity-linked inflammation and insulin resistance in HF-fed mice without altering food intake, weight gain, or adiposity. CONCLUSIONS - We conclude that inefficient biosynthesis of n-3 resolution mediators in muscle and adipose tissue contributes to the maintenance of chronic inflammation in obesity and that these novel lipids offer exciting potential for the treatment of insulin resistance and diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3066-3073
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes
Volume59
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Insulin Resistance
Obesity
Fats
Insulin
Inflammation
Muscles
Adipose Tissue
Lipids
Obese Mice
Adiposity
High Fat Diet
Glucose Tolerance Test
Chemokines
Transgenic Mice
Weight Gain
Research Design
Eating
Macrophages
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Transgenic restoration of long-chain n-3 fatty acids in insulin target tissues improves resolution capacity and alleviates obesity-linked inflammation and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed mice. / White, Phillip J.; Arita, Makoto; Taguchi, Ryo; Kang, Jing X.; Marette, André.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 59, No. 12, 12.2010, p. 3066-3073.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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