Translational research for cancer vaccine therapy with poxviral vectors expressing TAA and costimulatory molecules

Chie Kudo-Saito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cancer vaccine therapy utilizing recombinant viral vectors is one of the newest immunotherapies available for treatment of cancers. The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, NCI/NIH, USA, has been conducting a translational research program for the purpose of developing active immunotherapy to induce anti-tumor immune responses in cancer patients. They developed novel vaccines encoding transgenes for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and a triad of costimulatory molecules, which are designated as "TRICOM" vectors. Experimental murine studies have demonstrated that TRICOM vectors effectively enhance TAA-specific T-cell immune responses followed by cure of mice. The efficacy has been evaluated in clinical trials for a variety of cancers at numerous cancer centers around the USA. The vaccine strategy has been now expanded to the combination therapy with TRICOM vectors and other cancer therapies such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here the translational research in LTIB is reviewed including preclinical findings and clinical applications. These studies promise to be a valuable point of reference for cancer vaccine research in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-540
Number of pages6
JournalBiotherapy
Volume20
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Nov

Fingerprint

Active Immunotherapy
Cancer Vaccines
Translational Medical Research
Neoplasm Antigens
Neoplasms
Vaccines
Allergy and Immunology
Transgenes
Immunotherapy
Japan
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Clinical Trials
T-Lymphocytes
Drug Therapy
Research

Keywords

  • Costimulatory molecule
  • Poxviral vector
  • TAA
  • Translational research
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Translational research for cancer vaccine therapy with poxviral vectors expressing TAA and costimulatory molecules. / Kudo-Saito, Chie.

In: Biotherapy, Vol. 20, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 535-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c5dd21548c48433490c8a73bc8072dc0,
title = "Translational research for cancer vaccine therapy with poxviral vectors expressing TAA and costimulatory molecules",
abstract = "Cancer vaccine therapy utilizing recombinant viral vectors is one of the newest immunotherapies available for treatment of cancers. The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, NCI/NIH, USA, has been conducting a translational research program for the purpose of developing active immunotherapy to induce anti-tumor immune responses in cancer patients. They developed novel vaccines encoding transgenes for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and a triad of costimulatory molecules, which are designated as {"}TRICOM{"} vectors. Experimental murine studies have demonstrated that TRICOM vectors effectively enhance TAA-specific T-cell immune responses followed by cure of mice. The efficacy has been evaluated in clinical trials for a variety of cancers at numerous cancer centers around the USA. The vaccine strategy has been now expanded to the combination therapy with TRICOM vectors and other cancer therapies such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here the translational research in LTIB is reviewed including preclinical findings and clinical applications. These studies promise to be a valuable point of reference for cancer vaccine research in Japan.",
keywords = "Costimulatory molecule, Poxviral vector, TAA, Translational research, Vaccine",
author = "Chie Kudo-Saito",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "535--540",
journal = "Biotherapy",
issn = "0914-2223",
publisher = "Japanese Society for Cancer Chemotherapy",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Translational research for cancer vaccine therapy with poxviral vectors expressing TAA and costimulatory molecules

AU - Kudo-Saito, Chie

PY - 2006/11

Y1 - 2006/11

N2 - Cancer vaccine therapy utilizing recombinant viral vectors is one of the newest immunotherapies available for treatment of cancers. The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, NCI/NIH, USA, has been conducting a translational research program for the purpose of developing active immunotherapy to induce anti-tumor immune responses in cancer patients. They developed novel vaccines encoding transgenes for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and a triad of costimulatory molecules, which are designated as "TRICOM" vectors. Experimental murine studies have demonstrated that TRICOM vectors effectively enhance TAA-specific T-cell immune responses followed by cure of mice. The efficacy has been evaluated in clinical trials for a variety of cancers at numerous cancer centers around the USA. The vaccine strategy has been now expanded to the combination therapy with TRICOM vectors and other cancer therapies such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here the translational research in LTIB is reviewed including preclinical findings and clinical applications. These studies promise to be a valuable point of reference for cancer vaccine research in Japan.

AB - Cancer vaccine therapy utilizing recombinant viral vectors is one of the newest immunotherapies available for treatment of cancers. The Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, NCI/NIH, USA, has been conducting a translational research program for the purpose of developing active immunotherapy to induce anti-tumor immune responses in cancer patients. They developed novel vaccines encoding transgenes for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and a triad of costimulatory molecules, which are designated as "TRICOM" vectors. Experimental murine studies have demonstrated that TRICOM vectors effectively enhance TAA-specific T-cell immune responses followed by cure of mice. The efficacy has been evaluated in clinical trials for a variety of cancers at numerous cancer centers around the USA. The vaccine strategy has been now expanded to the combination therapy with TRICOM vectors and other cancer therapies such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Here the translational research in LTIB is reviewed including preclinical findings and clinical applications. These studies promise to be a valuable point of reference for cancer vaccine research in Japan.

KW - Costimulatory molecule

KW - Poxviral vector

KW - TAA

KW - Translational research

KW - Vaccine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846179009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846179009&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33846179009

VL - 20

SP - 535

EP - 540

JO - Biotherapy

JF - Biotherapy

SN - 0914-2223

IS - 6

ER -