Transplantation of human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury in primates

A. Iwanami, S. Kaneko, Masaya Nakamura, Y. Kanemura, H. Mori, S. Kobayashi, M. Yamasaki, Suketaka Momoshima, H. Ishii, K. Ando, Y. Tanioka, N. Tamaoki, T. Nomura, Y. Toyama, Hideyuki Okano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

284 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that delayed transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) into the injured spinal cord can promote functional recovery in adult rats. Preclinical studies using nonhuman primates, however, are necessary before NSPCs can be used in clinical trials to treat human patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Cervical contusion SCIs were induced in 10 adult common marmosets using a stereotaxic device. Nine days after injury, in vitro-expanded human NSPCs were transplanted into the spinal cord of five randomly selected animals, and the other sham-operated control animals received culture medium alone. Motor functions were evaluated through measurements of bar grip power and spontaneous motor activity, and temporal changes in the intramedullary signals were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. Eight weeks after transplantation, all animals were sacrificed. Histologic analysis revealed that the grafted human NSPCs survived and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, and that the cavities were smaller than those in sham-operated control animals. The bar grip power and the spontaneous motor activity of the transplanted animals were significantly higher than those of sham-operated control animals. These findings show that NSPC transplantation was effective for SCI in primates and suggest that human NSPC transplantation could be a feasible treatment for human SCI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-190
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Apr 15

Fingerprint

Neural Stem Cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Primates
Stem Cells
Transplantation
Stem Cell Transplantation
Hand Strength
Spinal Cord
Motor Activity
Callithrix
Contusions
Oligodendroglia
Astrocytes
Culture Media
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Clinical Trials
Neurons
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Neural stem/progenitor cells
  • Preclinical study
  • Primate
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Transplantation of human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury in primates. / Iwanami, A.; Kaneko, S.; Nakamura, Masaya; Kanemura, Y.; Mori, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamasaki, M.; Momoshima, Suketaka; Ishii, H.; Ando, K.; Tanioka, Y.; Tamaoki, N.; Nomura, T.; Toyama, Y.; Okano, Hideyuki.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 80, No. 2, 15.04.2005, p. 182-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iwanami, A, Kaneko, S, Nakamura, M, Kanemura, Y, Mori, H, Kobayashi, S, Yamasaki, M, Momoshima, S, Ishii, H, Ando, K, Tanioka, Y, Tamaoki, N, Nomura, T, Toyama, Y & Okano, H 2005, 'Transplantation of human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury in primates', Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 182-190. https://doi.org/10.1002/jnr.20436
Iwanami, A. ; Kaneko, S. ; Nakamura, Masaya ; Kanemura, Y. ; Mori, H. ; Kobayashi, S. ; Yamasaki, M. ; Momoshima, Suketaka ; Ishii, H. ; Ando, K. ; Tanioka, Y. ; Tamaoki, N. ; Nomura, T. ; Toyama, Y. ; Okano, Hideyuki. / Transplantation of human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury in primates. In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 2005 ; Vol. 80, No. 2. pp. 182-190.
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