Transplanted endothelial progenitor cells augment the survival areas of rat dorsal flaps

Yoshiaki Kubota, Kazuo Kishi, Hiroko Satoh, Takara Tanaka, Hideo Nakajima, Tatsuo Nakajima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been identified in peripheral blood, and have been reported to be incorporated into ischemic regions such as the ischemic hindlimb. In this study, we examined whether or not transplantation of EPCs is useful for salvaging surgical flaps in vivo. At the same time, we quantitatively compared the neovascularization ability of transplanted EPCs and that of mature endothelial cells (ECs). ECs obtained from the aorta of rats by explantation and passaged several times were used in the present study. EPCs were obtained from the blood of rat hearts. The blood samples were separated by density gradient centrifugation. Light-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) were collected and cultured on plastic plates coated with rat plasma vitronectin. Cells attached at day 7 of culture were deemed to be EPCs. Then PBS (control), ECs, or EPCs (3.0 × 105 suspended in 1.0 ml PBS) were injected at the middle of a flap. Seven days after surgery, the survival lengths of the flaps were evaluated. EPC-transplanted groups revealed statistically significant augmentation of survival length compared with the other two groups (p < 0.003). EPC-transplanted groups had significantly more angiographically detectable blood vessels (p < 0.003) and significantly higher capillary density (p < 0.03) than the other two groups. Confocal microscopy revealed that EPCs were incorporated into enhanced neovascularization. These results suggest that transplantation of EPCs may be useful for salvaging surgical flaps, and EPCs are superior to ECs in neovascularization ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)647-657
Number of pages11
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume12
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Endothelial cells
Rats
Cell Survival
Endothelial Cells
Flaps
Surgical Flaps
Salvaging
Blood
Endothelial Progenitor Cells
Transplantation
Vitronectin
Density Gradient Centrifugation
Hindlimb
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Confocal Microscopy
Plastics
Blood Vessels
Aorta
Centrifugation
Confocal microscopy

Keywords

  • Endothelial cell
  • Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)
  • Flap
  • Neovascularization
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Transplanted endothelial progenitor cells augment the survival areas of rat dorsal flaps. / Kubota, Yoshiaki; Kishi, Kazuo; Satoh, Hiroko; Tanaka, Takara; Nakajima, Hideo; Nakajima, Tatsuo.

In: Cell Transplantation, Vol. 12, No. 6, 2003, p. 647-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kubota, Y, Kishi, K, Satoh, H, Tanaka, T, Nakajima, H & Nakajima, T 2003, 'Transplanted endothelial progenitor cells augment the survival areas of rat dorsal flaps', Cell Transplantation, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 647-657.
Kubota, Yoshiaki ; Kishi, Kazuo ; Satoh, Hiroko ; Tanaka, Takara ; Nakajima, Hideo ; Nakajima, Tatsuo. / Transplanted endothelial progenitor cells augment the survival areas of rat dorsal flaps. In: Cell Transplantation. 2003 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 647-657.
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