Trapping and delaying light with an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal nanocavity

Takasumi Tanabe, Eiichi Kuramochi, Hideaki Taniyama, Masaya Notomi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have fabricated a photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity based on a width-modulated line defect and investigated it in the time domain. The obtained quality factor (Q) was extremely high, 1.2×106, which corresponds to a photon lifetime of 1 ns. The photon lifetime was directly measured in the time domain using the ring-down method-a technique that has the potential to provide detailed information about the temporal dynamics of PhC nanocavity systems. Indeed, we investigated the dynamic tuning of Q and the pulse transmission using a similar technique. In the pulse transmission experiment, the pulse exhibited ultraslow propagation with a group velocity of 5.8 km/s. The demonstration of slow light on a chip paves the way for the development of various quantum and classical integrated devices.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNTT Technical Review
Volume6
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Photonic crystals
Photons
Slow light
Demonstrations
Tuning
Defects
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Trapping and delaying light with an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal nanocavity. / Tanabe, Takasumi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya.

In: NTT Technical Review, Vol. 6, No. 8, 08.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanabe, Takasumi ; Kuramochi, Eiichi ; Taniyama, Hideaki ; Notomi, Masaya. / Trapping and delaying light with an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal nanocavity. In: NTT Technical Review. 2008 ; Vol. 6, No. 8.
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