Treatment trends in dry eye disease and factors associated with ophthalmic follow-up discontinuation in Japan

Miki Uchino, Norihiko Yokoi, Motoko Kawashima, Yamanishi Ryutaro, Yuichi Uchino, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the importance of dry eye disease (DED) treatment, the rate of DED treatment discontinuation, especially discontinuation of ophthalmic follow-up, remains unknown. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and risk factors of ophthalmic follow-up discontinuation for DED. A cross-sectional survey of 1030 participants was conducted using a self-administered web-survey instrument. We collected lifestyle information, history of DED diagnosis, types of treatment, frequency of eye-drop usage, symptoms, and the reasons for discontinuing treatment. Statistical analyses including logistic regression were used to evaluate the risk factors of discontinuing ophthalmic follow-up for DED. A past history of clinical DED diagnosis was reported by 155 (15.0%) subjects. Of those, 130 had persistent DED, and 88 (67.7%) of the subjects reported discontinuation of ophthalmic follow-up for DED. The most prevalent reasons for ophthalmic follow-up discontinuation were time restrictions, followed by dissatisfaction with the DED treatment. Duration after DED diagnosis was the only significant risk factor for discontinuing ophthalmic follow-up after adjusting for age and sex (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval = 1.02–1.17, p = 0.009). In conclusion, longer DED duration after diagnosis was a significant risk factor for discontinuing ophthalmic follow-up for DED. This study showed that DED ophthalmic follow-up discontinuation involves both medical and non-medical reasons. Clinicians need to be aware of them, and preventative effort is needed to avoid discontinuation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1120
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug

Keywords

  • Dry eye disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Ophthalmic follow-up discontinuation
  • Web-based survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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