Two-dimensional spatial positioning as a means for reflection in design

Kumiyo Nakakoji, Yasuhiro Yamamoto, Shingo Takada, Brent N. Reeves

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In the realm of computer support for design, developers have focused primarily on power and expressiveness that are important in framing a design solution. They assume that design is a series of calculated steps that lead to a clearly specified goal. The problem with this focus is that the resulting tools hinder the very process that is critical in early phases of a design task; the reflection-in-action process. In the early phases, what is required as the most important ingredient for a design tool is the ability to interact in ways that require as little commitment as possible. This aspect is most evident in domains where two dimensions play a role, such as sketching in architecture. Surprisingly, it is equally true in linear domains such as writing. In this paper, we present our approach of using two-dimensional positioning of objects as a means for reflection in the early phases of a design task. Taking writing as an example, the ART (Amplifying Representational Talkback) system uses two dimensional positioning to support the early stages of the writing task. An eye-tracking user study illustrates important issues in the domain of computer support for design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages145-154
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1
EventProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000) - New York, NY, USA
Duration: 2000 Aug 172000 Aug 19

Other

OtherProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000)
CityNew York, NY, USA
Period00/8/1700/8/19

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Nakakoji, K., Yamamoto, Y., Takada, S., & Reeves, B. N. (2000). Two-dimensional spatial positioning as a means for reflection in design. 145-154. Paper presented at Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000), New York, NY, USA, .