Two-step matrix application technique to improve ionization efficiency for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in imaging mass spectrometry

Yuki Sugiura, Shuichi Shimma, Mitsutoshi Setou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A novel matrix application protocol for direct tissue mass spectrometry is presented. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization is a popular ionization procedure for direct tissue analysis and imaging mass spectrometry. Usually, matrixes are applied by dispensing droplets through either pipettes or automated dispensing machines, or by air-brushing. These techniques are very simple, but it was difficult to obtain uniform matrix crystals on the tissue surface, and nonuniform crystals degrade the spectrum qualities. Here we report a new matrix application protocol, which is a combination of spraying and dispensing droplets, and we have succeeded in overcoming these problems in conventional matrix applications on tissue surfaces. We call our new technique the "spray-droplet method". In this technique, tiny matrix crystals formed by spraying act as seeds for crystal growth. Our technique leads to matrix spots that are filled homogeneously with minute crystals. Such matrix crystals dramatically improve peak intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an example on a rat brain section, the number of detectable peaks was increased and signal intensity of m/z 5440 in our method was ∼30.6 times higher than that in conventional methods. We used this spray-droplet method with a chemical ink-jet technology for matrix deposition to succeed in MALDI imaging of signals, which were undetectable from the conventional matrix applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8227-8235
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume78
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 15
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ionization
Mass spectrometry
Desorption
Imaging techniques
Crystals
Lasers
Tissue
Spraying
Crystallization
Ink
Seed
Rats
Brain
Signal to noise ratio
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Two-step matrix application technique to improve ionization efficiency for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in imaging mass spectrometry. / Sugiura, Yuki; Shimma, Shuichi; Setou, Mitsutoshi.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 78, No. 24, 15.12.2006, p. 8227-8235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5503d12c36fe4ad7b48c2904baf52074,
title = "Two-step matrix application technique to improve ionization efficiency for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in imaging mass spectrometry",
abstract = "A novel matrix application protocol for direct tissue mass spectrometry is presented. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization is a popular ionization procedure for direct tissue analysis and imaging mass spectrometry. Usually, matrixes are applied by dispensing droplets through either pipettes or automated dispensing machines, or by air-brushing. These techniques are very simple, but it was difficult to obtain uniform matrix crystals on the tissue surface, and nonuniform crystals degrade the spectrum qualities. Here we report a new matrix application protocol, which is a combination of spraying and dispensing droplets, and we have succeeded in overcoming these problems in conventional matrix applications on tissue surfaces. We call our new technique the {"}spray-droplet method{"}. In this technique, tiny matrix crystals formed by spraying act as seeds for crystal growth. Our technique leads to matrix spots that are filled homogeneously with minute crystals. Such matrix crystals dramatically improve peak intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an example on a rat brain section, the number of detectable peaks was increased and signal intensity of m/z 5440 in our method was ∼30.6 times higher than that in conventional methods. We used this spray-droplet method with a chemical ink-jet technology for matrix deposition to succeed in MALDI imaging of signals, which were undetectable from the conventional matrix applications.",
author = "Yuki Sugiura and Shuichi Shimma and Mitsutoshi Setou",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1021/ac060974v",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "8227--8235",
journal = "Analytical Chemistry",
issn = "0003-2700",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Two-step matrix application technique to improve ionization efficiency for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in imaging mass spectrometry

AU - Sugiura, Yuki

AU - Shimma, Shuichi

AU - Setou, Mitsutoshi

PY - 2006/12/15

Y1 - 2006/12/15

N2 - A novel matrix application protocol for direct tissue mass spectrometry is presented. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization is a popular ionization procedure for direct tissue analysis and imaging mass spectrometry. Usually, matrixes are applied by dispensing droplets through either pipettes or automated dispensing machines, or by air-brushing. These techniques are very simple, but it was difficult to obtain uniform matrix crystals on the tissue surface, and nonuniform crystals degrade the spectrum qualities. Here we report a new matrix application protocol, which is a combination of spraying and dispensing droplets, and we have succeeded in overcoming these problems in conventional matrix applications on tissue surfaces. We call our new technique the "spray-droplet method". In this technique, tiny matrix crystals formed by spraying act as seeds for crystal growth. Our technique leads to matrix spots that are filled homogeneously with minute crystals. Such matrix crystals dramatically improve peak intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an example on a rat brain section, the number of detectable peaks was increased and signal intensity of m/z 5440 in our method was ∼30.6 times higher than that in conventional methods. We used this spray-droplet method with a chemical ink-jet technology for matrix deposition to succeed in MALDI imaging of signals, which were undetectable from the conventional matrix applications.

AB - A novel matrix application protocol for direct tissue mass spectrometry is presented. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization is a popular ionization procedure for direct tissue analysis and imaging mass spectrometry. Usually, matrixes are applied by dispensing droplets through either pipettes or automated dispensing machines, or by air-brushing. These techniques are very simple, but it was difficult to obtain uniform matrix crystals on the tissue surface, and nonuniform crystals degrade the spectrum qualities. Here we report a new matrix application protocol, which is a combination of spraying and dispensing droplets, and we have succeeded in overcoming these problems in conventional matrix applications on tissue surfaces. We call our new technique the "spray-droplet method". In this technique, tiny matrix crystals formed by spraying act as seeds for crystal growth. Our technique leads to matrix spots that are filled homogeneously with minute crystals. Such matrix crystals dramatically improve peak intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an example on a rat brain section, the number of detectable peaks was increased and signal intensity of m/z 5440 in our method was ∼30.6 times higher than that in conventional methods. We used this spray-droplet method with a chemical ink-jet technology for matrix deposition to succeed in MALDI imaging of signals, which were undetectable from the conventional matrix applications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845543697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845543697&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/ac060974v

DO - 10.1021/ac060974v

M3 - Article

VL - 78

SP - 8227

EP - 8235

JO - Analytical Chemistry

JF - Analytical Chemistry

SN - 0003-2700

IS - 24

ER -