TypeTile: A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing

Yasuko Hayashi, Kensei Jo, Yasuaki Kakehi, Takeshi Naemura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Generally, people use a keyboards as an interface for text input. However, unlike handwritten characters, typed characters are identical no matter who types them. To create variations in the appearance of typed characters, we usually decorate characters by changing fonts. For example, we change the font size, font color and boldness of the characters and the spacing between characters. However, due to these decorations, people must handle a few input processes such as checking the select menu. To improve current conditions, some research suggests methods of applying the user's unconscious actions while typing to decorate characters, using a laptop with a built-in acceleration sensor or body-worn electronic equipment [Iwasaki et al. 2009][Wang et al. 2004][TypeTrace 2006].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventSIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09 - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: 2009 Aug 32009 Aug 7

Other

OtherSIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period09/8/309/8/7

Fingerprint

Electronic equipment
Color
Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Hayashi, Y., Jo, K., Kakehi, Y., & Naemura, T. (2009). TypeTile: A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing. In SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09 [55]

TypeTile : A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing. / Hayashi, Yasuko; Jo, Kensei; Kakehi, Yasuaki; Naemura, Takeshi.

SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09. 2009. 55.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hayashi, Y, Jo, K, Kakehi, Y & Naemura, T 2009, TypeTile: A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing. in SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09., 55, SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09, New Orleans, LA, United States, 09/8/3.
Hayashi Y, Jo K, Kakehi Y, Naemura T. TypeTile: A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing. In SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09. 2009. 55
Hayashi, Yasuko ; Jo, Kensei ; Kakehi, Yasuaki ; Naemura, Takeshi. / TypeTile : A keyboard system that decorates characters depending on the way of typing. SIGGRAPH 2009: Posters, SIGGRAPH '09. 2009.
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