Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal

Atsushi Yokoo, Takasumi Tanabe, Eiichi Kuramochi, Masaya Notomi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The attractiveness of a photonic crystal can be attributed to its unique optical characteristics. Specifically, the photonic crystal cavity provides strong light confinement, and enables the switching of light with very low threshold power. In a conventional process, to add this functionality, we have to modify its periodical structure during the CAD data processing step before electron beam lithography. This requirement limits the freedom of fabrication process. We can eliminate this limitation by taking advantage of the mode gap phenomena, with which we can furnish new cavity in the pre-patterned photonic crystal structure. The details of our cavity formation mechanism are described in reference 1). In Fig. 1(b), the pre-patterned structure is a line defect waveguide in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal slab, and we assume that the refractive index is modulated in the yellow shaded region. A very small spatial index modulation (δn/n < 0.1%) changes the mode-gap edge frequency of the modified area to create barrier regions, while the unmodified area retains its original mode-gap edge frequency. As a result, an ultrahigh-Q cavity with a small volume can be created.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011
Pages324-325
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event24th Annual Meeting on IEEE Photonic Society, PHO 2011 - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: 2011 Oct 92011 Oct 13

Other

Other24th Annual Meeting on IEEE Photonic Society, PHO 2011
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period11/10/911/10/13

Fingerprint

lithography
microscopes
photonics
cavities
scanning
probes
crystals
computer aided design
slabs
electron beams
refractivity
waveguides
modulation
requirements
fabrication
crystal structure
thresholds
defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Yokoo, A., Tanabe, T., Kuramochi, E., & Notomi, M. (2011). Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal. In IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011 (pp. 324-325). [6110558] https://doi.org/10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558

Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal. / Yokoo, Atsushi; Tanabe, Takasumi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya.

IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011. 2011. p. 324-325 6110558.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yokoo, A, Tanabe, T, Kuramochi, E & Notomi, M 2011, Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal. in IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011., 6110558, pp. 324-325, 24th Annual Meeting on IEEE Photonic Society, PHO 2011, Arlington, VA, United States, 11/10/9. https://doi.org/10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558
Yokoo A, Tanabe T, Kuramochi E, Notomi M. Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal. In IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011. 2011. p. 324-325. 6110558 https://doi.org/10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558
Yokoo, Atsushi ; Tanabe, Takasumi ; Kuramochi, Eiichi ; Notomi, Masaya. / Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal. IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011. 2011. pp. 324-325
@inproceedings{c175ae526f14422dba8e4f16387ff287,
title = "Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal",
abstract = "The attractiveness of a photonic crystal can be attributed to its unique optical characteristics. Specifically, the photonic crystal cavity provides strong light confinement, and enables the switching of light with very low threshold power. In a conventional process, to add this functionality, we have to modify its periodical structure during the CAD data processing step before electron beam lithography. This requirement limits the freedom of fabrication process. We can eliminate this limitation by taking advantage of the mode gap phenomena, with which we can furnish new cavity in the pre-patterned photonic crystal structure. The details of our cavity formation mechanism are described in reference 1). In Fig. 1(b), the pre-patterned structure is a line defect waveguide in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal slab, and we assume that the refractive index is modulated in the yellow shaded region. A very small spatial index modulation (δn/n < 0.1{\%}) changes the mode-gap edge frequency of the modified area to create barrier regions, while the unmodified area retains its original mode-gap edge frequency. As a result, an ultrahigh-Q cavity with a small volume can be created.",
author = "Atsushi Yokoo and Takasumi Tanabe and Eiichi Kuramochi and Masaya Notomi",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781424489404",
pages = "324--325",
booktitle = "IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Ultrahigh-Q nanocavities fabricated by scanning probe microscope lithography on pre-patterned photonic crystal

AU - Yokoo, Atsushi

AU - Tanabe, Takasumi

AU - Kuramochi, Eiichi

AU - Notomi, Masaya

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The attractiveness of a photonic crystal can be attributed to its unique optical characteristics. Specifically, the photonic crystal cavity provides strong light confinement, and enables the switching of light with very low threshold power. In a conventional process, to add this functionality, we have to modify its periodical structure during the CAD data processing step before electron beam lithography. This requirement limits the freedom of fabrication process. We can eliminate this limitation by taking advantage of the mode gap phenomena, with which we can furnish new cavity in the pre-patterned photonic crystal structure. The details of our cavity formation mechanism are described in reference 1). In Fig. 1(b), the pre-patterned structure is a line defect waveguide in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal slab, and we assume that the refractive index is modulated in the yellow shaded region. A very small spatial index modulation (δn/n < 0.1%) changes the mode-gap edge frequency of the modified area to create barrier regions, while the unmodified area retains its original mode-gap edge frequency. As a result, an ultrahigh-Q cavity with a small volume can be created.

AB - The attractiveness of a photonic crystal can be attributed to its unique optical characteristics. Specifically, the photonic crystal cavity provides strong light confinement, and enables the switching of light with very low threshold power. In a conventional process, to add this functionality, we have to modify its periodical structure during the CAD data processing step before electron beam lithography. This requirement limits the freedom of fabrication process. We can eliminate this limitation by taking advantage of the mode gap phenomena, with which we can furnish new cavity in the pre-patterned photonic crystal structure. The details of our cavity formation mechanism are described in reference 1). In Fig. 1(b), the pre-patterned structure is a line defect waveguide in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal slab, and we assume that the refractive index is modulated in the yellow shaded region. A very small spatial index modulation (δn/n < 0.1%) changes the mode-gap edge frequency of the modified area to create barrier regions, while the unmodified area retains its original mode-gap edge frequency. As a result, an ultrahigh-Q cavity with a small volume can be created.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856011351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856011351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558

DO - 10.1109/PHO.2011.6110558

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84856011351

SN - 9781424489404

SP - 324

EP - 325

BT - IEEE Photonic Society 24th Annual Meeting, PHO 2011

ER -