Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics

Kazuto Masamoto, Miyuki Unekawa, Tatsushi Watanabe, Haruki Toriumi, Hiroyuki Takuwa, Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Iwao Kanno, Ko Matsui, Kenji Tanaka, Yutaka Tomita, Norihiro Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cortical neural activities lead to changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF), which involves astrocytic control of cerebrovascular tone. However, the manner in which astrocytic activity specifically leads to vasodilation or vasoconstriction is difficult to determine. Here, cortical astrocytes genetically expressing a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), were transcranially activated with a blue laser while the spatiotemporal changes in CBF were noninvasively monitored with laser speckle flowgraphy in the anesthetised mouse cortex. A brief photostimulation induced a fast transient increase in CBF. The average response onset time was 0.7 ± 0.7 sec at the activation foci, and this CBF increase spread widely from the irradiation spot with an apparent propagation speed of 0.8-1.1 mm/sec. The broad increase in the CBF could be due to a propagation of diffusible vasoactive signals derived from the stimulated astrocytes. Pharmacological manipulation showed that topical administration of a K + channel inhibitor (BaCl<inf>2</inf>; 0.1-0.5 mM) significantly reduced the photostimulation-induced CBF responses, which indicates that the ChR2-evoked astrocytic activity involves K + signalling to the vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings demonstrate a unique model for exploring the role of the astrocytes in gliovascular coupling using non-invasive, time-controlled, cell-type specific perturbations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11455
JournalScientific Reports
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 16

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Optogenetics
Astrocytes
Lasers
Topical Administration
Vasoconstriction
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Vasodilation
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Cations
Pharmacology
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Masamoto, K., Unekawa, M., Watanabe, T., Toriumi, H., Takuwa, H., Kawaguchi, H., ... Suzuki, N. (2015). Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics. Scientific Reports, 5, [11455]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep11455

Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics. / Masamoto, Kazuto; Unekawa, Miyuki; Watanabe, Tatsushi; Toriumi, Haruki; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao; Matsui, Ko; Tanaka, Kenji; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 5, 11455, 16.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Masamoto, K, Unekawa, M, Watanabe, T, Toriumi, H, Takuwa, H, Kawaguchi, H, Kanno, I, Matsui, K, Tanaka, K, Tomita, Y & Suzuki, N 2015, 'Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics', Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 11455. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep11455
Masamoto K, Unekawa M, Watanabe T, Toriumi H, Takuwa H, Kawaguchi H et al. Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics. Scientific Reports. 2015 Jun 16;5. 11455. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep11455
Masamoto, Kazuto ; Unekawa, Miyuki ; Watanabe, Tatsushi ; Toriumi, Haruki ; Takuwa, Hiroyuki ; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi ; Kanno, Iwao ; Matsui, Ko ; Tanaka, Kenji ; Tomita, Yutaka ; Suzuki, Norihiro. / Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics. In: Scientific Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
@article{e2b1112703904c49977631cdb6415965,
title = "Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics",
abstract = "Cortical neural activities lead to changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF), which involves astrocytic control of cerebrovascular tone. However, the manner in which astrocytic activity specifically leads to vasodilation or vasoconstriction is difficult to determine. Here, cortical astrocytes genetically expressing a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), were transcranially activated with a blue laser while the spatiotemporal changes in CBF were noninvasively monitored with laser speckle flowgraphy in the anesthetised mouse cortex. A brief photostimulation induced a fast transient increase in CBF. The average response onset time was 0.7 ± 0.7 sec at the activation foci, and this CBF increase spread widely from the irradiation spot with an apparent propagation speed of 0.8-1.1 mm/sec. The broad increase in the CBF could be due to a propagation of diffusible vasoactive signals derived from the stimulated astrocytes. Pharmacological manipulation showed that topical administration of a K + channel inhibitor (BaCl2; 0.1-0.5 mM) significantly reduced the photostimulation-induced CBF responses, which indicates that the ChR2-evoked astrocytic activity involves K + signalling to the vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings demonstrate a unique model for exploring the role of the astrocytes in gliovascular coupling using non-invasive, time-controlled, cell-type specific perturbations.",
author = "Kazuto Masamoto and Miyuki Unekawa and Tatsushi Watanabe and Haruki Toriumi and Hiroyuki Takuwa and Hiroshi Kawaguchi and Iwao Kanno and Ko Matsui and Kenji Tanaka and Yutaka Tomita and Norihiro Suzuki",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1038/srep11455",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unveiling astrocytic control of cerebral blood flow with optogenetics

AU - Masamoto, Kazuto

AU - Unekawa, Miyuki

AU - Watanabe, Tatsushi

AU - Toriumi, Haruki

AU - Takuwa, Hiroyuki

AU - Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

AU - Kanno, Iwao

AU - Matsui, Ko

AU - Tanaka, Kenji

AU - Tomita, Yutaka

AU - Suzuki, Norihiro

PY - 2015/6/16

Y1 - 2015/6/16

N2 - Cortical neural activities lead to changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF), which involves astrocytic control of cerebrovascular tone. However, the manner in which astrocytic activity specifically leads to vasodilation or vasoconstriction is difficult to determine. Here, cortical astrocytes genetically expressing a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), were transcranially activated with a blue laser while the spatiotemporal changes in CBF were noninvasively monitored with laser speckle flowgraphy in the anesthetised mouse cortex. A brief photostimulation induced a fast transient increase in CBF. The average response onset time was 0.7 ± 0.7 sec at the activation foci, and this CBF increase spread widely from the irradiation spot with an apparent propagation speed of 0.8-1.1 mm/sec. The broad increase in the CBF could be due to a propagation of diffusible vasoactive signals derived from the stimulated astrocytes. Pharmacological manipulation showed that topical administration of a K + channel inhibitor (BaCl2; 0.1-0.5 mM) significantly reduced the photostimulation-induced CBF responses, which indicates that the ChR2-evoked astrocytic activity involves K + signalling to the vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings demonstrate a unique model for exploring the role of the astrocytes in gliovascular coupling using non-invasive, time-controlled, cell-type specific perturbations.

AB - Cortical neural activities lead to changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF), which involves astrocytic control of cerebrovascular tone. However, the manner in which astrocytic activity specifically leads to vasodilation or vasoconstriction is difficult to determine. Here, cortical astrocytes genetically expressing a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), were transcranially activated with a blue laser while the spatiotemporal changes in CBF were noninvasively monitored with laser speckle flowgraphy in the anesthetised mouse cortex. A brief photostimulation induced a fast transient increase in CBF. The average response onset time was 0.7 ± 0.7 sec at the activation foci, and this CBF increase spread widely from the irradiation spot with an apparent propagation speed of 0.8-1.1 mm/sec. The broad increase in the CBF could be due to a propagation of diffusible vasoactive signals derived from the stimulated astrocytes. Pharmacological manipulation showed that topical administration of a K + channel inhibitor (BaCl2; 0.1-0.5 mM) significantly reduced the photostimulation-induced CBF responses, which indicates that the ChR2-evoked astrocytic activity involves K + signalling to the vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings demonstrate a unique model for exploring the role of the astrocytes in gliovascular coupling using non-invasive, time-controlled, cell-type specific perturbations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935838387&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935838387&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/srep11455

DO - 10.1038/srep11455

M3 - Article

C2 - 26076820

AN - SCOPUS:84935838387

VL - 5

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 11455

ER -