Use of a cane for recovery from backward balance loss during treadmill walking

Masaki Hyodo, Mayumi Saito, Junichi Ushiba, Yutaka Tomita, Yoshihisa Masakado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To study whether a cane improved balance recovery after perturbation during walking. Method. This study was a crossover comparison comparing the effect of walking with and without a cane for balance recovery after perturbation during treadmill walking. Five normal young volunteers participated. The velocity and acceleration of a marker sited on the seventh cerebral vertebra (C7) and vertical hand motion were measured by a motion analysis system. Result. When using a cane, C7 backward velocity increased by approximately 15% (413 SD 95 mm/s with cane vs. 358 SD 88 mm/s without). In addition, C7 backward acceleration increased by approximately 23% (3.2 SD 0.7 m/s2 with cane vs. 2.6 SD 0.8 m/s2 without) and the vertical motion of the right hand decreased (187 SD 98 mm with cane vs. 372 SD 260 mm without). Additionally, no subject was able to use a cane to broaden their base of support. Conclusions. The ability to limit trunk extension is crucial for preventing falls. Therefore, using a cane jeopardizes recovery from backward balance loss. The results encourage further research on the risk of a cane on balance recovery for the elderly population and habitual cane users.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalSomatosensory and Motor Research
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun

Fingerprint

Canes
Walking
Hand
Healthy Volunteers
Spine

Keywords

  • Ambulatory assistive device
  • Perturbation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Slip

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Use of a cane for recovery from backward balance loss during treadmill walking. / Hyodo, Masaki; Saito, Mayumi; Ushiba, Junichi; Tomita, Yutaka; Masakado, Yoshihisa.

In: Somatosensory and Motor Research, Vol. 30, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 65-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hyodo, Masaki ; Saito, Mayumi ; Ushiba, Junichi ; Tomita, Yutaka ; Masakado, Yoshihisa. / Use of a cane for recovery from backward balance loss during treadmill walking. In: Somatosensory and Motor Research. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 65-71.
@article{21d88e08885440beb825d11d61ca0ebe,
title = "Use of a cane for recovery from backward balance loss during treadmill walking",
abstract = "Purpose. To study whether a cane improved balance recovery after perturbation during walking. Method. This study was a crossover comparison comparing the effect of walking with and without a cane for balance recovery after perturbation during treadmill walking. Five normal young volunteers participated. The velocity and acceleration of a marker sited on the seventh cerebral vertebra (C7) and vertical hand motion were measured by a motion analysis system. Result. When using a cane, C7 backward velocity increased by approximately 15{\%} (413 SD 95 mm/s with cane vs. 358 SD 88 mm/s without). In addition, C7 backward acceleration increased by approximately 23{\%} (3.2 SD 0.7 m/s2 with cane vs. 2.6 SD 0.8 m/s2 without) and the vertical motion of the right hand decreased (187 SD 98 mm with cane vs. 372 SD 260 mm without). Additionally, no subject was able to use a cane to broaden their base of support. Conclusions. The ability to limit trunk extension is crucial for preventing falls. Therefore, using a cane jeopardizes recovery from backward balance loss. The results encourage further research on the risk of a cane on balance recovery for the elderly population and habitual cane users.",
keywords = "Ambulatory assistive device, Perturbation, Rehabilitation, Slip",
author = "Masaki Hyodo and Mayumi Saito and Junichi Ushiba and Yutaka Tomita and Yoshihisa Masakado",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.3109/08990220.2012.760450",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "65--71",
journal = "Somatosensory Research",
issn = "0899-0220",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of a cane for recovery from backward balance loss during treadmill walking

AU - Hyodo, Masaki

AU - Saito, Mayumi

AU - Ushiba, Junichi

AU - Tomita, Yutaka

AU - Masakado, Yoshihisa

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - Purpose. To study whether a cane improved balance recovery after perturbation during walking. Method. This study was a crossover comparison comparing the effect of walking with and without a cane for balance recovery after perturbation during treadmill walking. Five normal young volunteers participated. The velocity and acceleration of a marker sited on the seventh cerebral vertebra (C7) and vertical hand motion were measured by a motion analysis system. Result. When using a cane, C7 backward velocity increased by approximately 15% (413 SD 95 mm/s with cane vs. 358 SD 88 mm/s without). In addition, C7 backward acceleration increased by approximately 23% (3.2 SD 0.7 m/s2 with cane vs. 2.6 SD 0.8 m/s2 without) and the vertical motion of the right hand decreased (187 SD 98 mm with cane vs. 372 SD 260 mm without). Additionally, no subject was able to use a cane to broaden their base of support. Conclusions. The ability to limit trunk extension is crucial for preventing falls. Therefore, using a cane jeopardizes recovery from backward balance loss. The results encourage further research on the risk of a cane on balance recovery for the elderly population and habitual cane users.

AB - Purpose. To study whether a cane improved balance recovery after perturbation during walking. Method. This study was a crossover comparison comparing the effect of walking with and without a cane for balance recovery after perturbation during treadmill walking. Five normal young volunteers participated. The velocity and acceleration of a marker sited on the seventh cerebral vertebra (C7) and vertical hand motion were measured by a motion analysis system. Result. When using a cane, C7 backward velocity increased by approximately 15% (413 SD 95 mm/s with cane vs. 358 SD 88 mm/s without). In addition, C7 backward acceleration increased by approximately 23% (3.2 SD 0.7 m/s2 with cane vs. 2.6 SD 0.8 m/s2 without) and the vertical motion of the right hand decreased (187 SD 98 mm with cane vs. 372 SD 260 mm without). Additionally, no subject was able to use a cane to broaden their base of support. Conclusions. The ability to limit trunk extension is crucial for preventing falls. Therefore, using a cane jeopardizes recovery from backward balance loss. The results encourage further research on the risk of a cane on balance recovery for the elderly population and habitual cane users.

KW - Ambulatory assistive device

KW - Perturbation

KW - Rehabilitation

KW - Slip

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877934112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84877934112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/08990220.2012.760450

DO - 10.3109/08990220.2012.760450

M3 - Article

C2 - 23346928

AN - SCOPUS:84877934112

VL - 30

SP - 65

EP - 71

JO - Somatosensory Research

JF - Somatosensory Research

SN - 0899-0220

IS - 2

ER -