Vacuum-venipuncture skills: Time required and importance of tube order

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess specific vacuum-venipuncture skills and the influence of the time involved in skin puncture and blood collection. Methods: Thirty subjects undergoing venipuncture in which video analysis was possible were included. These procedures were carried out by four nurses and recorded with a digital camera. Venipuncture skills classified by our observations were delineated on the basis of frame-by-frame video images, and a graph of x and y coordinates was created. Results: With the first blood-collection tube, strong blood flow required the practitioner to push the tube back in to compensate for the strong repulsive force in approximately 46% of cases. By the third blood-collection tube, the blood flow had weakened; therefore, the tube was moved up and down. In cases that required a second venipuncture, the tube was already pierced, so the time required to fill it to 5 mL was significantly longer. Conclusion: Hand movement of the practitioner is adjusted according to blood flow. Reflex movement in response to strong blood flow may increase the risk of pushing the needle through the vein with excessive force. The time required to fill the tube varies among nurses, tube order, and level of venipuncture skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)457-464
Number of pages8
JournalVascular Health and Risk Management
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Phlebotomy
Vacuum
Nurses
Punctures
Needles
Reflex
Veins
Hand
Skin

Keywords

  • Blood collection
  • Blood-collection tube
  • Clinical practice
  • Venipuncture skill

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Hematology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Vacuum-venipuncture skills : Time required and importance of tube order. / Fujii, Chieko.

In: Vascular Health and Risk Management, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2013, p. 457-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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