Validity of a Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Index, Brain Metastasis Velocity, for Patients With Brain Metastasis Undergoing Multiple Radiosurgical Procedures

Masaaki Yamamoto, Hitoshi Aiyama, Takao Koiso, Shinya Watanabe, Takuya Kawabe, Yasunori Sato, Yoshinori Higuchi, Hidetoshi Kasuya, Bierta E. Barfod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study of our patients with brain metastasis who underwent multiple stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedures aimed to validate whether the recently proposed prognostic grading system, brain metastasis velocity (BMV), is generally applicable. The BMV scores the cumulative number of new brain metastases that developed after the first SRS divided by time (years) since the initial SRS. Patients were categorized into 3 classes by their BMV scores (ie, ≤3, 4-13, and ≥14). Methods and Materials: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the Tokyo Women's Medical University Institutional Review Board (number 1981). We used our prospectively accumulated database, which included 833 patients who underwent a second SRS procedure for newly detected lesions, using a gamma knife, for brain metastases. Patients who had whole-brain radiation therapy were excluded. The procedures took place during the 19-year period between July 1998 and June 2017. Furthermore, among the 833 patients, 250 underwent a third SRS procedure, and 88 had a fourth SRS procedure. Results: The median survival times (MSTs) after the second SRS were 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.2-17.1) for the BMV group with a score of ≤3; 7.5 months (CI, 6.5-9.0) for the group scoring 4 to 13, and 5.1 months (CI, 4.0-5.6) for the group scoring ≥14 (P =.0001). The corresponding MSTs after the third SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P =.0001). Respective MSTs after the fourth SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P <.0001). The mean BMV score of patients with small cell lung cancer, 24.8, was significantly higher than that of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 17.7 (P =.032). Conclusions: Our present results support the validity of BMV for predicting survival not only after the second SRS but also after the third and fourth SRS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-637
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Radiosurgery
metastasis
brain
confidence
Neoplasm Metastasis
intervals
Confidence Intervals
Brain
scoring
Survival
lungs
cancer
Tokyo
Research Ethics Committees
Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
group velocity
lesions
Reproducibility of Results
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Validity of a Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Index, Brain Metastasis Velocity, for Patients With Brain Metastasis Undergoing Multiple Radiosurgical Procedures. / Yamamoto, Masaaki; Aiyama, Hitoshi; Koiso, Takao; Watanabe, Shinya; Kawabe, Takuya; Sato, Yasunori; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Barfod, Bierta E.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 103, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 631-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamamoto, Masaaki ; Aiyama, Hitoshi ; Koiso, Takao ; Watanabe, Shinya ; Kawabe, Takuya ; Sato, Yasunori ; Higuchi, Yoshinori ; Kasuya, Hidetoshi ; Barfod, Bierta E. / Validity of a Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Index, Brain Metastasis Velocity, for Patients With Brain Metastasis Undergoing Multiple Radiosurgical Procedures. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2019 ; Vol. 103, No. 3. pp. 631-637.
@article{477f43e69ace44009732584f80f6b52a,
title = "Validity of a Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Index, Brain Metastasis Velocity, for Patients With Brain Metastasis Undergoing Multiple Radiosurgical Procedures",
abstract = "Purpose: This study of our patients with brain metastasis who underwent multiple stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedures aimed to validate whether the recently proposed prognostic grading system, brain metastasis velocity (BMV), is generally applicable. The BMV scores the cumulative number of new brain metastases that developed after the first SRS divided by time (years) since the initial SRS. Patients were categorized into 3 classes by their BMV scores (ie, ≤3, 4-13, and ≥14). Methods and Materials: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the Tokyo Women's Medical University Institutional Review Board (number 1981). We used our prospectively accumulated database, which included 833 patients who underwent a second SRS procedure for newly detected lesions, using a gamma knife, for brain metastases. Patients who had whole-brain radiation therapy were excluded. The procedures took place during the 19-year period between July 1998 and June 2017. Furthermore, among the 833 patients, 250 underwent a third SRS procedure, and 88 had a fourth SRS procedure. Results: The median survival times (MSTs) after the second SRS were 12.9 months (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 10.2-17.1) for the BMV group with a score of ≤3; 7.5 months (CI, 6.5-9.0) for the group scoring 4 to 13, and 5.1 months (CI, 4.0-5.6) for the group scoring ≥14 (P =.0001). The corresponding MSTs after the third SRS were 13.2 months (95{\%} CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P =.0001). Respective MSTs after the fourth SRS were 13.2 months (95{\%} CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P <.0001). The mean BMV score of patients with small cell lung cancer, 24.8, was significantly higher than that of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 17.7 (P =.032). Conclusions: Our present results support the validity of BMV for predicting survival not only after the second SRS but also after the third and fourth SRS.",
author = "Masaaki Yamamoto and Hitoshi Aiyama and Takao Koiso and Shinya Watanabe and Takuya Kawabe and Yasunori Sato and Yoshinori Higuchi and Hidetoshi Kasuya and Barfod, {Bierta E.}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.10.036",
language = "English",
volume = "103",
pages = "631--637",
journal = "International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics",
issn = "0360-3016",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validity of a Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Index, Brain Metastasis Velocity, for Patients With Brain Metastasis Undergoing Multiple Radiosurgical Procedures

AU - Yamamoto, Masaaki

AU - Aiyama, Hitoshi

AU - Koiso, Takao

AU - Watanabe, Shinya

AU - Kawabe, Takuya

AU - Sato, Yasunori

AU - Higuchi, Yoshinori

AU - Kasuya, Hidetoshi

AU - Barfod, Bierta E.

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Purpose: This study of our patients with brain metastasis who underwent multiple stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedures aimed to validate whether the recently proposed prognostic grading system, brain metastasis velocity (BMV), is generally applicable. The BMV scores the cumulative number of new brain metastases that developed after the first SRS divided by time (years) since the initial SRS. Patients were categorized into 3 classes by their BMV scores (ie, ≤3, 4-13, and ≥14). Methods and Materials: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the Tokyo Women's Medical University Institutional Review Board (number 1981). We used our prospectively accumulated database, which included 833 patients who underwent a second SRS procedure for newly detected lesions, using a gamma knife, for brain metastases. Patients who had whole-brain radiation therapy were excluded. The procedures took place during the 19-year period between July 1998 and June 2017. Furthermore, among the 833 patients, 250 underwent a third SRS procedure, and 88 had a fourth SRS procedure. Results: The median survival times (MSTs) after the second SRS were 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.2-17.1) for the BMV group with a score of ≤3; 7.5 months (CI, 6.5-9.0) for the group scoring 4 to 13, and 5.1 months (CI, 4.0-5.6) for the group scoring ≥14 (P =.0001). The corresponding MSTs after the third SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P =.0001). Respective MSTs after the fourth SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P <.0001). The mean BMV score of patients with small cell lung cancer, 24.8, was significantly higher than that of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 17.7 (P =.032). Conclusions: Our present results support the validity of BMV for predicting survival not only after the second SRS but also after the third and fourth SRS.

AB - Purpose: This study of our patients with brain metastasis who underwent multiple stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedures aimed to validate whether the recently proposed prognostic grading system, brain metastasis velocity (BMV), is generally applicable. The BMV scores the cumulative number of new brain metastases that developed after the first SRS divided by time (years) since the initial SRS. Patients were categorized into 3 classes by their BMV scores (ie, ≤3, 4-13, and ≥14). Methods and Materials: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the Tokyo Women's Medical University Institutional Review Board (number 1981). We used our prospectively accumulated database, which included 833 patients who underwent a second SRS procedure for newly detected lesions, using a gamma knife, for brain metastases. Patients who had whole-brain radiation therapy were excluded. The procedures took place during the 19-year period between July 1998 and June 2017. Furthermore, among the 833 patients, 250 underwent a third SRS procedure, and 88 had a fourth SRS procedure. Results: The median survival times (MSTs) after the second SRS were 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.2-17.1) for the BMV group with a score of ≤3; 7.5 months (CI, 6.5-9.0) for the group scoring 4 to 13, and 5.1 months (CI, 4.0-5.6) for the group scoring ≥14 (P =.0001). The corresponding MSTs after the third SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P =.0001). Respective MSTs after the fourth SRS were 13.2 months (95% CI, 9.1-21.6), 8.0 months (CI, 6.2-11.2), and 5.7 months (CI, 4.8-7.8; P <.0001). The mean BMV score of patients with small cell lung cancer, 24.8, was significantly higher than that of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 17.7 (P =.032). Conclusions: Our present results support the validity of BMV for predicting survival not only after the second SRS but also after the third and fourth SRS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060496867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060496867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.10.036

DO - 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.10.036

M3 - Article

C2 - 30395905

AN - SCOPUS:85060496867

VL - 103

SP - 631

EP - 637

JO - International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics

JF - International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics

SN - 0360-3016

IS - 3

ER -