Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays

María Oyarzábal, Masashi Nakatani, Robert D. Howe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tactile displays can provide detailed spatial information to the skin, but little is known about the effects of vibrating displayed shapes. This study examines passive touch perception of flat and indented surfaces displayed on a 36 pin tactile display with 2 mm pin pitch. Subjects could not perceive a 0.1 mm deep central indentation when it was presented statically, but it was readily detected when the pattern was vibrated at 5 Hz. A central raised bar was incorrectly perceived as indented when the adjacent pins were vibrated, which is consistent with the "fishbone tactile illusion" (Nakatani et al., Proc. EuroHaptics 2006). These results suggest that tactile display devices can use vibrational stimulus to enhance perception of small differences in height.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007
Pages44-49
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07 - Tsukuba, Japan
Duration: 2007 Mar 222007 Mar 24

Other

Other2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07
CountryJapan
CityTsukuba
Period07/3/2207/3/24

Fingerprint

Display devices
Geometry
Indentation
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Oyarzábal, M., Nakatani, M., & Howe, R. D. (2007). Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays. In Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007 (pp. 44-49). [4145149] https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.124

Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays. / Oyarzábal, María; Nakatani, Masashi; Howe, Robert D.

Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. p. 44-49 4145149.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Oyarzábal, M, Nakatani, M & Howe, RD 2007, Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays. in Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007., 4145149, pp. 44-49, 2nd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007, WHC'07, Tsukuba, Japan, 07/3/22. https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.124
Oyarzábal M, Nakatani M, Howe RD. Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays. In Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. p. 44-49. 4145149 https://doi.org/10.1109/WHC.2007.124
Oyarzábal, María ; Nakatani, Masashi ; Howe, Robert D. / Vibration enhances geometry perception with tactile shape displays. Proceedings - Second Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2007. 2007. pp. 44-49
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