VIGOUR, ENTHUSIASM and PRINCIPLES: EDMUND BURKE'S VIEWS of EUROPEAN HISTORY

Sora Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This essay analyses Burke's ideas on European history, which lay scattered over his works, and suggests that Burke may have considered Europe, with the notable exception of ancient Rome, as having been in a state of barbarism or confusion from the ancient era until the sixteenth century, despite the gradual development of society. Unlike some of his contemporaries, he did not closely examine the growth of a European state system, nor the rise of the balance of power in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Nor did he specially underline the collapse of feudalism and the process of establishing absolute monarchy. Instead, Burke stressed more fundamental elements. While he often drew attention to the glimmer of hope towards future prosperity amid devastation, which dominated large parts of European history, his ideas on European history reflected his long-held social theory that nations could revive and develop as long as the foundations of society were not damaged.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-325
Number of pages27
JournalModern Intellectual History
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Aug 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'VIGOUR, ENTHUSIASM and PRINCIPLES: EDMUND BURKE'S VIEWS of EUROPEAN HISTORY'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this