Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in children and adolescents with renal disease

Hisayo Fujita, Seiji Matsuoka, Midori Awazu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increase in blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events, target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in adults. We previously reported that 24-h BPV may be associated with arterial stiffness and underlie white-coat hypertension (WCH). In this study, we examined whether visit-to-visit variability (VVV) could predict WCH and whether VVV correlated with eGFR, eGFR slope, and albuminuria/proteinuria in children and adolescents with renal diseases. Methods: VVV was determined as average real variability of office BP measurements between visits, and 24-h BPV as the standard deviation of 24-h ambulatory BP. In 35 renal patients (25 boys and 10 girls, 7–18 years of age), divided into normotension (NT), WCH, and hypertension (HTN), the relationships between VVV and 24-h BPV and VVV in each BP category were studied. In separate 48 renal patients (24 boys and 24 girls, 2–18 years of age), the correlation between VVV and eGFR, eGFR slope, urine albumin or protein excretion was examined. Results: Systolic VVV was significantly correlated with systolic office BP index. There was no correlation between VVV and 24-h BPV or 24-h pulse pressure. In addition, VVV was not different among NT, WCH, and HTN. Systolic VVV was significantly negatively correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria, or proteinuria. A cut-off value of systolic VVV for detecting eGFR < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 was 8.5. Conclusion: VVV could not predict WCH. Systolic VVV correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria/proteinuria. Increased VVV could be a marker of decreased eGFR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Nephrology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Mar 14

Fingerprint

White Coat Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Kidney
Albuminuria
Proteinuria
Vascular Stiffness
Hypertension
Albumins
Urine
Proteins

Keywords

  • Average real variability
  • Blood pressure variability
  • Children
  • eGFR
  • Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio
  • Visit-to-visit variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Nephrology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in children and adolescents with renal disease. / Fujita, Hisayo; Matsuoka, Seiji; Awazu, Midori.

In: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, 14.03.2018, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Increase in blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events, target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in adults. We previously reported that 24-h BPV may be associated with arterial stiffness and underlie white-coat hypertension (WCH). In this study, we examined whether visit-to-visit variability (VVV) could predict WCH and whether VVV correlated with eGFR, eGFR slope, and albuminuria/proteinuria in children and adolescents with renal diseases. Methods: VVV was determined as average real variability of office BP measurements between visits, and 24-h BPV as the standard deviation of 24-h ambulatory BP. In 35 renal patients (25 boys and 10 girls, 7–18 years of age), divided into normotension (NT), WCH, and hypertension (HTN), the relationships between VVV and 24-h BPV and VVV in each BP category were studied. In separate 48 renal patients (24 boys and 24 girls, 2–18 years of age), the correlation between VVV and eGFR, eGFR slope, urine albumin or protein excretion was examined. Results: Systolic VVV was significantly correlated with systolic office BP index. There was no correlation between VVV and 24-h BPV or 24-h pulse pressure. In addition, VVV was not different among NT, WCH, and HTN. Systolic VVV was significantly negatively correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria, or proteinuria. A cut-off value of systolic VVV for detecting eGFR < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 was 8.5. Conclusion: VVV could not predict WCH. Systolic VVV correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria/proteinuria. Increased VVV could be a marker of decreased eGFR.

AB - Background: Increase in blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) is associated with cardiovascular events, target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in adults. We previously reported that 24-h BPV may be associated with arterial stiffness and underlie white-coat hypertension (WCH). In this study, we examined whether visit-to-visit variability (VVV) could predict WCH and whether VVV correlated with eGFR, eGFR slope, and albuminuria/proteinuria in children and adolescents with renal diseases. Methods: VVV was determined as average real variability of office BP measurements between visits, and 24-h BPV as the standard deviation of 24-h ambulatory BP. In 35 renal patients (25 boys and 10 girls, 7–18 years of age), divided into normotension (NT), WCH, and hypertension (HTN), the relationships between VVV and 24-h BPV and VVV in each BP category were studied. In separate 48 renal patients (24 boys and 24 girls, 2–18 years of age), the correlation between VVV and eGFR, eGFR slope, urine albumin or protein excretion was examined. Results: Systolic VVV was significantly correlated with systolic office BP index. There was no correlation between VVV and 24-h BPV or 24-h pulse pressure. In addition, VVV was not different among NT, WCH, and HTN. Systolic VVV was significantly negatively correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria, or proteinuria. A cut-off value of systolic VVV for detecting eGFR < 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 was 8.5. Conclusion: VVV could not predict WCH. Systolic VVV correlated with eGFR but not with eGFR slope, albuminuria/proteinuria. Increased VVV could be a marker of decreased eGFR.

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