Visualization of acetylcholine distribution in central nervous system tissue sections by tandem imaging mass spectrometry

Yuki Sugiura, Nobuhiro Zaima, Mitsutoshi Setou, Seiji Ito, Ikuko Yao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metabolite distribution imaging via imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an increasingly utilized tool in the field of neurochemistry. As most previous IMS studies analyzed the relative abundances of larger metabolite species, it is important to expand its application to smaller molecules, such as neurotransmitters. This study aimed to develop an IMS application to visualize neurotransmitter distribution in central nervous system tissue sections. Here, we raise two technical problems that must be resolved to achieve neurotransmitter imaging: (1) the lower concentrations of bioactive molecules, compared with those of membrane lipids, require higher sensitivity and/or signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios in signal detection, and (2) the molecular turnover of the neurotransmitters is rapid; thus, tissue preparation procedures should be performed carefully to minimize postmortem changes. We first evaluated intrinsic sensitivity and matrix interference using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) to detect six neurotransmitters and chose acetylcholine (ACh) as a model for study. Next, we examined both single MS imaging and MS/MS imaging for ACh and found that via an ion transition from m/z146 to m/z87 in MS/MS imaging, ACh could be visualized with a high S/N ratio. Furthermore, we found that in situ freezing method of brain samples improved IMS data quality in terms of the number of effective pixels and the image contrast (i.e., the sensitivity and dynamic range). Therefore, by addressing the aforementioned problems, we demonstrated the tissue distribution of ACh, the most suitable molecular specimen for positive ion detection by IMS, to reveal its localization in central nervous system tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1851-1861
Number of pages11
JournalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Volume403
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nerve Tissue
Neurology
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Acetylcholine
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Visualization
Central Nervous System
Neurotransmitter Agents
Tissue
Imaging techniques
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Postmortem Changes
Ions
Neurochemistry
Contrast Sensitivity
Metabolites
Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Tissue Distribution
Membrane Lipids

Keywords

  • Acetylcholine
  • Imaging
  • Imaging mass spectrometry
  • Ims
  • MS
  • MS/MS
  • Neurotransmitter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Visualization of acetylcholine distribution in central nervous system tissue sections by tandem imaging mass spectrometry. / Sugiura, Yuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Seiji; Yao, Ikuko.

In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Vol. 403, No. 7, 06.2012, p. 1851-1861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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