What is the future of CCR5 antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis?

Tsutomu Takeuchi, Hideto Kameda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fleishaker and colleagues reported on a double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial of a C-C chemokine-receptor type 5 (CCR5) antagonist, maraviroc, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to methotrexate, showing that it was ineffective. Two additional CCR5 antagonists, SCH351125 and AZD5672, also failed to demonstrate clinical efficacy. In addition, CCR5-blocking antibodies could not inhibit synovial fluid-induced monocyte chemotaxis. Thus, CCR5 appears not to be a desirable target in RA treatment. Given the multiple functions of CCR5, redundancies in the chemokine system, and patient selection in the trial, we overview the recent understanding for chemokine receptor blockade in the treatment of RA.

Original languageEnglish
Article number114
JournalArthritis Research and Therapy
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 30

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CC Chemokines
Chemokine Receptors
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Blocking Antibodies
Synovial Fluid
Controlled Clinical Trials
Chemotaxis
Chemokines
Methotrexate
Patient Selection
Monocytes
Placebos
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What is the future of CCR5 antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis? / Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Kameda, Hideto.

In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, Vol. 14, No. 2, 114, 30.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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