What Makes Action and Outcome Temporally Close to Each Other: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Temporal Binding

Takumi Tanaka, Takuya Matsumoto, Shintaro Hayashi, Shiro Takagi, Hideaki Kawabata

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Temporal binding refers to the subjective compression of the temporal interval between a voluntary action and its external sensory consequences. While empirical evidence and theoretical accounts have indicated the potential linkage between temporal binding and action outcome prediction mechanisms, several questions regarding the underlying processes and the fundamental nature of temporal binding remain unanswered. Based on the sophisticated classification of predictive processes proposed by Hughes et al. (2013), we conducted a systematic, quantitative review of the binding effect as measured with two representative procedures, i.e., Libet clock procedure and interval estimation procedure. Although both procedures were designed to measure the same phenomenon, we revealed a larger effect size and higher sensitivity to perceptual moderators in binding observed with the clock procedure than with the interval estimation. Moreover, in the former, we observed different characteristics for the two perceptual shifts that comprise temporal binding. Action shifts depended more on whether one can control outcome onsets with voluntary actions. In contrast, outcome shifts depended more on the degree to which participants could predict, rather than control, the action outcome onset. These results indicate that action shift occurs based on the activation of learned action-outcome associations by planning and executing actions, while outcome shift occurs based on comparing predicted and observed outcomes. By understanding the nature of each experimental procedure and each shift, future research can use optimal methods depending on the goal. We discuss, as an example, the implications for the underlying disorders of agency in schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-218
Number of pages30
JournalTiming and Time Perception
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Meta-Analysis
Schizophrenia

Keywords

  • action outcome prediction
  • comparator model
  • intentional binding
  • interval estimation procedure
  • Libet clock procedure
  • meta-analysis
  • sense of agency
  • Temporal binding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

What Makes Action and Outcome Temporally Close to Each Other : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Temporal Binding. / Tanaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Hayashi, Shintaro; Takagi, Shiro; Kawabata, Hideaki.

In: Timing and Time Perception, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.01.2019, p. 189-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tanaka, Takumi ; Matsumoto, Takuya ; Hayashi, Shintaro ; Takagi, Shiro ; Kawabata, Hideaki. / What Makes Action and Outcome Temporally Close to Each Other : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Temporal Binding. In: Timing and Time Perception. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 189-218.
@article{16b299645ac347b8a32118dc2302b164,
title = "What Makes Action and Outcome Temporally Close to Each Other: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Temporal Binding",
abstract = "Temporal binding refers to the subjective compression of the temporal interval between a voluntary action and its external sensory consequences. While empirical evidence and theoretical accounts have indicated the potential linkage between temporal binding and action outcome prediction mechanisms, several questions regarding the underlying processes and the fundamental nature of temporal binding remain unanswered. Based on the sophisticated classification of predictive processes proposed by Hughes et al. (2013), we conducted a systematic, quantitative review of the binding effect as measured with two representative procedures, i.e., Libet clock procedure and interval estimation procedure. Although both procedures were designed to measure the same phenomenon, we revealed a larger effect size and higher sensitivity to perceptual moderators in binding observed with the clock procedure than with the interval estimation. Moreover, in the former, we observed different characteristics for the two perceptual shifts that comprise temporal binding. Action shifts depended more on whether one can control outcome onsets with voluntary actions. In contrast, outcome shifts depended more on the degree to which participants could predict, rather than control, the action outcome onset. These results indicate that action shift occurs based on the activation of learned action-outcome associations by planning and executing actions, while outcome shift occurs based on comparing predicted and observed outcomes. By understanding the nature of each experimental procedure and each shift, future research can use optimal methods depending on the goal. We discuss, as an example, the implications for the underlying disorders of agency in schizophrenia.",
keywords = "action outcome prediction, comparator model, intentional binding, interval estimation procedure, Libet clock procedure, meta-analysis, sense of agency, Temporal binding",
author = "Takumi Tanaka and Takuya Matsumoto and Shintaro Hayashi and Shiro Takagi and Hideaki Kawabata",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1163/22134468-20191150",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "189--218",
journal = "Timing and Time Perception",
issn = "2213-4468",
publisher = "Brill",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What Makes Action and Outcome Temporally Close to Each Other

T2 - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Temporal Binding

AU - Tanaka, Takumi

AU - Matsumoto, Takuya

AU - Hayashi, Shintaro

AU - Takagi, Shiro

AU - Kawabata, Hideaki

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Temporal binding refers to the subjective compression of the temporal interval between a voluntary action and its external sensory consequences. While empirical evidence and theoretical accounts have indicated the potential linkage between temporal binding and action outcome prediction mechanisms, several questions regarding the underlying processes and the fundamental nature of temporal binding remain unanswered. Based on the sophisticated classification of predictive processes proposed by Hughes et al. (2013), we conducted a systematic, quantitative review of the binding effect as measured with two representative procedures, i.e., Libet clock procedure and interval estimation procedure. Although both procedures were designed to measure the same phenomenon, we revealed a larger effect size and higher sensitivity to perceptual moderators in binding observed with the clock procedure than with the interval estimation. Moreover, in the former, we observed different characteristics for the two perceptual shifts that comprise temporal binding. Action shifts depended more on whether one can control outcome onsets with voluntary actions. In contrast, outcome shifts depended more on the degree to which participants could predict, rather than control, the action outcome onset. These results indicate that action shift occurs based on the activation of learned action-outcome associations by planning and executing actions, while outcome shift occurs based on comparing predicted and observed outcomes. By understanding the nature of each experimental procedure and each shift, future research can use optimal methods depending on the goal. We discuss, as an example, the implications for the underlying disorders of agency in schizophrenia.

AB - Temporal binding refers to the subjective compression of the temporal interval between a voluntary action and its external sensory consequences. While empirical evidence and theoretical accounts have indicated the potential linkage between temporal binding and action outcome prediction mechanisms, several questions regarding the underlying processes and the fundamental nature of temporal binding remain unanswered. Based on the sophisticated classification of predictive processes proposed by Hughes et al. (2013), we conducted a systematic, quantitative review of the binding effect as measured with two representative procedures, i.e., Libet clock procedure and interval estimation procedure. Although both procedures were designed to measure the same phenomenon, we revealed a larger effect size and higher sensitivity to perceptual moderators in binding observed with the clock procedure than with the interval estimation. Moreover, in the former, we observed different characteristics for the two perceptual shifts that comprise temporal binding. Action shifts depended more on whether one can control outcome onsets with voluntary actions. In contrast, outcome shifts depended more on the degree to which participants could predict, rather than control, the action outcome onset. These results indicate that action shift occurs based on the activation of learned action-outcome associations by planning and executing actions, while outcome shift occurs based on comparing predicted and observed outcomes. By understanding the nature of each experimental procedure and each shift, future research can use optimal methods depending on the goal. We discuss, as an example, the implications for the underlying disorders of agency in schizophrenia.

KW - action outcome prediction

KW - comparator model

KW - intentional binding

KW - interval estimation procedure

KW - Libet clock procedure

KW - meta-analysis

KW - sense of agency

KW - Temporal binding

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070894358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070894358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/22134468-20191150

DO - 10.1163/22134468-20191150

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:85070894358

VL - 7

SP - 189

EP - 218

JO - Timing and Time Perception

JF - Timing and Time Perception

SN - 2213-4468

IS - 3

ER -