What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence?

Aki Kawakami, Makoto Tanaka, Makoto Naganuma, Shin Maeda, Reiko Kunisaki, Noriko Yamamoto-Mitani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Overall, 30%–45% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are non-adherent and have difficulties taking their medications; this non-adherence increases the risk of clinical relapse 1.4- to 5.5-fold. This study aimed to clarify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and determine whether the strategies had an impact on good adherence. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire and review of medical records. Patients diagnosed as having UC and attending one of the outpatient clinics of four urban hospitals from June 2009 to December 2012 were enrolled. A questionnaire was developed to identify the strategies patients employ to facilitate adherence and then administered to patients with UC. Adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid was calculated, and univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the strategies that were associated with good adherence. Results: The final analyses included 671 participants (mean age 40.2 years; 54.3% males). The valid response rate was 96.9%; 186 (27.7%) participants were classified as non-adherent, the mean adherence rate being 86.1% (standard deviation [SD] 17.9). Seven strategies that patients employ to facilitate adherence were identified, the following two being significantly associated with good adherence: “I keep my medicines where I eat meals” and “I keep each day’s medicine in a pill case or something similar to make sure I have taken them”. Conclusion: The identified strategies might be used to develop a program to improve medication adherence in patients with UC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Preference and Adherence
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 27

Fingerprint

Ulcerative Colitis
medication
medicine
outpatient clinic
questionnaire
relapse
Mesalamine
meals
Medication Adherence
Urban Hospitals
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Medical Records
Meals
logistics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
regression
Regression Analysis
Medicine
Recurrence

Keywords

  • 5-aminosalicylic acid
  • Medication adherence
  • Self-management
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence? / Kawakami, Aki; Tanaka, Makoto; Naganuma, Makoto; Maeda, Shin; Kunisaki, Reiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko.

In: Patient Preference and Adherence, Vol. 11, 27.01.2017, p. 157-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawakami, Aki ; Tanaka, Makoto ; Naganuma, Makoto ; Maeda, Shin ; Kunisaki, Reiko ; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko. / What strategies do ulcerative colitis patients employ to facilitate adherence?. In: Patient Preference and Adherence. 2017 ; Vol. 11. pp. 157-163.
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