Whole body vibration exercise improves body balance and walking velocity in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate: Galileo and alendronate intervention trail (GAIT)

J. Iwamoto, Y. Sato, T. Takeda, H. Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the effect of 6 months of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate. Fifty-two ambulatory postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age: 74.2 years, range: 51-91 years) were randomly divided into two groups: an exercise group and a control group. A four-minute WBV exercise was performed two days per week only in the exercise group. No exercise was performed in the control group. All the women were treated with alendronate. After 6 months of the WBV exercise, the indices for flexibility, body balance, and walking velocity were significantly improved in the exercise group compared with the control group. The exercise was safe and well tolerated. The reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen during the 6-month period were comparable between the two groups. The present study showed the benefit and safety of WBV exercise for improving physical function in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with alendronate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-143
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions
Volume12
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Body balance
  • Flexibility
  • Osteoporosis
  • Walking velocity
  • Whole body vibration exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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