Work-related psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome onset among workers

a systematic review and meta-analysis

K. Watanabe, A. Sakuraya, N. Kawakami, K. Imamura, E. Ando, Y. Asai, H. Eguchi, Y. Kobayashi, N. Nishida, H. Arima, Akihito Shimazu, A. Tsutsumi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Work-related psychosocial factors have been associated with metabolic syndrome. However, no systematic reviews or meta-analyses have evaluated this association. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted, using PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society. Eligible studies included those that examined the previously mentioned association; had a longitudinal or prospective cohort design; were conducted among workers; provided sufficient data for calculating odds ratios, relative risks or hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals; were original articles in English or Japanese; and were published no later than 2016. Study characteristics, exposure and outcome variables and association measures of studies were extracted by the investigators independently. Results: Among 4,664 identified studies, 8 were eligible for review and meta-analysis. The pooled risk of adverse work-related stress on metabolic syndrome onset was significant and positive (RR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.22–1.78). Sensitivity analyses limiting only the effects of job strain and shift work also indicated a significant positive relationship (RR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.09–2.79; and RR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.00–2.54, P = 0.049 respectively). Conclusion: This study reveals a strong positive association between work-related psychosocial factors and an elevated risk of metabolic syndrome onset. The effects of job strain and shift work on metabolic syndrome appear to be significant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1568
Number of pages12
JournalObesity Reviews
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

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Meta-Analysis
Psychology
Medical Societies
PubMed
Japan
Odds Ratio
Research Personnel
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • metabolic syndrome
  • psychosocial
  • worker
  • workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Watanabe, K., Sakuraya, A., Kawakami, N., Imamura, K., Ando, E., Asai, Y., ... Tsutsumi, A. (2018). Work-related psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome onset among workers: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 19(11), 1557-1568. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12725

Work-related psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome onset among workers : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Watanabe, K.; Sakuraya, A.; Kawakami, N.; Imamura, K.; Ando, E.; Asai, Y.; Eguchi, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nishida, N.; Arima, H.; Shimazu, Akihito; Tsutsumi, A.

In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. 19, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1557-1568.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Watanabe, K, Sakuraya, A, Kawakami, N, Imamura, K, Ando, E, Asai, Y, Eguchi, H, Kobayashi, Y, Nishida, N, Arima, H, Shimazu, A & Tsutsumi, A 2018, 'Work-related psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome onset among workers: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 1557-1568. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12725
Watanabe, K. ; Sakuraya, A. ; Kawakami, N. ; Imamura, K. ; Ando, E. ; Asai, Y. ; Eguchi, H. ; Kobayashi, Y. ; Nishida, N. ; Arima, H. ; Shimazu, Akihito ; Tsutsumi, A. / Work-related psychosocial factors and metabolic syndrome onset among workers : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Obesity Reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 1557-1568.
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