Work-self balance

A longitudinal study on the effects of job demands and resources on personal functioning in Japanese working parents

Evangelia Demerouti, Akihito Shimazu, Arnold B. Bakker, Kyoko Shimada, Norito Kawakami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In work-family research the effects on the individual, or the "self", in terms of personal interests independent of the work and family domains, have been largely neglected. This longitudinal study on 471 Japanese employees with young children investigated how job demands and job resources may have an impact on well-being by facilitating or hindering personal functioning. It was hypothesized that workload would have an unfavourable impact on work-to-self conflict, while supervisor support would have a favourable impact on work-to-self facilitation. In addition, we hypothesized that work-self conflict would diminish well-being (psychological distress and happiness), while work-self facilitation would enhance well-being over time. Structural equation modelling analyses using a full panel design showed that work overload was positively related to work-self conflict over time, whereas supervisor support was positively related to work-self facilitation. Furthermore, work-self conflict predicted psychological distress and happiness at T2, one year later, after controlling for T1 levels. These findings suggest that the demands and resources encountered at work can spill over to the home domain and have an impact on personal functioning and context-free well-being. Further research is needed to determine the importance of work-self constructs in relation to work-family constructs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-243
Number of pages21
JournalWork and Stress
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Happiness
Psychology
Workload

Keywords

  • conflict
  • facilitation
  • happiness
  • Japanese
  • psychological distress
  • work-family interface
  • work-related stress
  • work-self interface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Work-self balance : A longitudinal study on the effects of job demands and resources on personal functioning in Japanese working parents. / Demerouti, Evangelia; Shimazu, Akihito; Bakker, Arnold B.; Shimada, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito.

In: Work and Stress, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.07.2013, p. 223-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Demerouti, Evangelia ; Shimazu, Akihito ; Bakker, Arnold B. ; Shimada, Kyoko ; Kawakami, Norito. / Work-self balance : A longitudinal study on the effects of job demands and resources on personal functioning in Japanese working parents. In: Work and Stress. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 223-243.
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