Zinc and heme iron intakes and risk of colorectal cancer: A population-based prospective cohort study in Japan

Azusa Hara, Shizuka Sasazuki, Manami Inoue, Motoki Iwasaki, Taichi Shimazu, Norie Sawada, Taiki Yamaji, Ribeka Takachi, Shoichiro Tsugane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Food sources and intakes of zinc and heme iron may differ between Western and Asian populations. However, all of the studies on the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer have been conducted in Western populations. Objective: We investigated the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer risk in a Japanese general population. Design: We conducted a large, population-based prospective study in 39,721 men and 45,376 women aged 45-74 y. Heme iron and zinc intakes were measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire in either 1995 or 1998. Results: During as many as 808,053 person-years of follow-up until the end of 2006, 1284 colorectal cancer cases were identified. In multivariate-adjusted models, zinc and heme iron intakes were not associated with colorectal cancer in either men or women. In comparison with the lowest quartile, the HRs (95% CIs) for developing colorectal cancer in the fourth quartile of zinc and heme iron intakes were 0.77 (0.58, 1.03; P-trend = 0.2) and 1.06 (0.79, 1.42; P-trend = 0.6), respectively, for men and 1.05 (0.77, 1.44; P-trend = 0.4) and 0.88 (0.61, 1.29; P-trend = 0.4), respectively, for women. Conclusion: Our results in a Japanese population with lower intakes and different major food sources of zinc and heme iron in comparison with those of Western populations suggest that zinc and heme iron intakes are not associated with colorectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)864-873
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

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Heme
Zinc
Colorectal Neoplasms
Japan
Cohort Studies
Iron
Prospective Studies
Population
Food
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Zinc and heme iron intakes and risk of colorectal cancer : A population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. / Hara, Azusa; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sawada, Norie; Yamaji, Taiki; Takachi, Ribeka; Tsugane, Shoichiro.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 96, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 864-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hara, A, Sasazuki, S, Inoue, M, Iwasaki, M, Shimazu, T, Sawada, N, Yamaji, T, Takachi, R & Tsugane, S 2012, 'Zinc and heme iron intakes and risk of colorectal cancer: A population-based prospective cohort study in Japan', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 4, pp. 864-873. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.041202
Hara, Azusa ; Sasazuki, Shizuka ; Inoue, Manami ; Iwasaki, Motoki ; Shimazu, Taichi ; Sawada, Norie ; Yamaji, Taiki ; Takachi, Ribeka ; Tsugane, Shoichiro. / Zinc and heme iron intakes and risk of colorectal cancer : A population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 96, No. 4. pp. 864-873.
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AU - Hara, Azusa

AU - Sasazuki, Shizuka

AU - Inoue, Manami

AU - Iwasaki, Motoki

AU - Shimazu, Taichi

AU - Sawada, Norie

AU - Yamaji, Taiki

AU - Takachi, Ribeka

AU - Tsugane, Shoichiro

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N2 - Background: Food sources and intakes of zinc and heme iron may differ between Western and Asian populations. However, all of the studies on the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer have been conducted in Western populations. Objective: We investigated the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer risk in a Japanese general population. Design: We conducted a large, population-based prospective study in 39,721 men and 45,376 women aged 45-74 y. Heme iron and zinc intakes were measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire in either 1995 or 1998. Results: During as many as 808,053 person-years of follow-up until the end of 2006, 1284 colorectal cancer cases were identified. In multivariate-adjusted models, zinc and heme iron intakes were not associated with colorectal cancer in either men or women. In comparison with the lowest quartile, the HRs (95% CIs) for developing colorectal cancer in the fourth quartile of zinc and heme iron intakes were 0.77 (0.58, 1.03; P-trend = 0.2) and 1.06 (0.79, 1.42; P-trend = 0.6), respectively, for men and 1.05 (0.77, 1.44; P-trend = 0.4) and 0.88 (0.61, 1.29; P-trend = 0.4), respectively, for women. Conclusion: Our results in a Japanese population with lower intakes and different major food sources of zinc and heme iron in comparison with those of Western populations suggest that zinc and heme iron intakes are not associated with colorectal cancer.

AB - Background: Food sources and intakes of zinc and heme iron may differ between Western and Asian populations. However, all of the studies on the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer have been conducted in Western populations. Objective: We investigated the association between zinc and heme iron intakes and colorectal cancer risk in a Japanese general population. Design: We conducted a large, population-based prospective study in 39,721 men and 45,376 women aged 45-74 y. Heme iron and zinc intakes were measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire in either 1995 or 1998. Results: During as many as 808,053 person-years of follow-up until the end of 2006, 1284 colorectal cancer cases were identified. In multivariate-adjusted models, zinc and heme iron intakes were not associated with colorectal cancer in either men or women. In comparison with the lowest quartile, the HRs (95% CIs) for developing colorectal cancer in the fourth quartile of zinc and heme iron intakes were 0.77 (0.58, 1.03; P-trend = 0.2) and 1.06 (0.79, 1.42; P-trend = 0.6), respectively, for men and 1.05 (0.77, 1.44; P-trend = 0.4) and 0.88 (0.61, 1.29; P-trend = 0.4), respectively, for women. Conclusion: Our results in a Japanese population with lower intakes and different major food sources of zinc and heme iron in comparison with those of Western populations suggest that zinc and heme iron intakes are not associated with colorectal cancer.

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