A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan: A potential new endpoint of cancer care

Ayumi Igarashi, Mitsunori Miyashita, Tatsuya Morita, Nobuya Akizuki, Miki Akiyama, Yutaka Shirahige, Kenji Eguchi

研究成果: Article

11 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Context: Having a sense of security about the availability of care is important for cancer patients and their families. Objectives: To develop a scale for the general population to evaluate feelings of support and security regarding cancer care, and to identify factors associated with a sense of security. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire was administered to 8000 subjects in four areas of Japan. Sense of security was measured using five statements and using a seven-point Likert scale: "If I get cancer 1) I would feel secure in receiving cancer treatment, 2) my pain would be well relieved, 3) medical staff will adequately respond to my concerns and pain, 4) I would feel secure as a variety of medical care services are available, and 5) I would feel secure in receiving care at home." We performed an exploratory factor analysis as well as uni- and multivariate analyses to examine factors associated with such a sense of security. Results: The five items regarding sense of security were aggregated into one factor, and Cronbach's α was 0.91. In the Yamagata area where palliative care services were not available, the sense of security was significantly lower than in the other three regions. Female gender (P = 0.035), older age (P < 0.001), and having cancer (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with a strong sense of security. Conclusion: A new scale that evaluates sense of security with regard to cancer care was developed. Future studies should examine whether establishing a regional health care system that provides quality palliative care could improve the sense of security of the general population.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)218-225
ページ数8
ジャーナルJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
43
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2012 2

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Japan
Emotions
Neoplasms
Palliative Care
Pain
Quality of Health Care
Medical Staff
Home Care Services
Population
Statistical Factor Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Nursing(all)

これを引用

A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan : A potential new endpoint of cancer care. / Igarashi, Ayumi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji.

:: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 巻 43, 番号 2, 02.2012, p. 218-225.

研究成果: Article

Igarashi, Ayumi ; Miyashita, Mitsunori ; Morita, Tatsuya ; Akizuki, Nobuya ; Akiyama, Miki ; Shirahige, Yutaka ; Eguchi, Kenji. / A scale for measuring feelings of support and security regarding cancer care in a region of Japan : A potential new endpoint of cancer care. :: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2012 ; 巻 43, 番号 2. pp. 218-225.
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